Borat 1.0?

Quick, name a mustachioed foreign journalist whose lust for women and penchant for quirky English earned him a massive Internet following. Did you guess Borat? Wrong. In the late 1990s, before British comedian Sacha Baron Cohen even had his own television show, the website of Turkish “jurnalist (sic), music and sport (sic) teacher” Mahir Cargi ...

Quick, name a mustachioed foreign journalist whose lust for women and penchant for quirky English earned him a massive Internet following. Did you guess Borat? Wrong. In the late 1990s, before British comedian Sacha Baron Cohen even had his own television show, the website of Turkish "jurnalist (sic), music and sport (sic) teacher" Mahir Cargi was drawing hundreds of thousands of hits.

Cargi is back in a recent Wired interview and he's mad. "All people know Sacha Baron Cohen imitate only me," he wrote to the magazine. "If possible you can help me too for stop this or find good lawyer?"

So, add at least one Turk to the majority of Kazakhs who have it in for the actor who plays Borat. Despite Kazakhstan Deputy Foreign Minister Rakhat Aliyev's recent invitation for Cohen to visit Kazakhstan, many in the country remain unhappy with his character. For instance, after boasting about his country's democratic reforms, Kazakh opposition leader Zharmakhan Tuyakbai said of Borat, "If I see him, I'll hit him in the face."

Quick, name a mustachioed foreign journalist whose lust for women and penchant for quirky English earned him a massive Internet following. Did you guess Borat? Wrong. In the late 1990s, before British comedian Sacha Baron Cohen even had his own television show, the website of Turkish “jurnalist (sic), music and sport (sic) teacher” Mahir Cargi was drawing hundreds of thousands of hits.

Cargi is back in a recent Wired interview and he’s mad. “All people know Sacha Baron Cohen imitate only me,” he wrote to the magazine. “If possible you can help me too for stop this or find good lawyer?”

So, add at least one Turk to the majority of Kazakhs who have it in for the actor who plays Borat. Despite Kazakhstan Deputy Foreign Minister Rakhat Aliyev’s recent invitation for Cohen to visit Kazakhstan, many in the country remain unhappy with his character. For instance, after boasting about his country’s democratic reforms, Kazakh opposition leader Zharmakhan Tuyakbai said of Borat, “If I see him, I’ll hit him in the face.”

“In a country where the rules are more strict than ours, there would have been a government decree to destroy Borat,” said what the AP describes as Kazahkistan’s “most liberal political voice.” In other words, Cohen may have all the fame and money, but at least Cargi doesn’t have an entire nation calling for his head.

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