What the Republicans can look forward to

Now that the Democrats control both the Senate and the House, they’re set to take over powerful congressional committees – and that has the Bush administration nervous about investigations into the management of the Iraq war, intelligence failures, and the fiasco that was Hurricane Katrina. So, who are a few of the new chairmen and ...

606224_Capitol35.jpg
606224_Capitol35.jpg

Now that the Democrats control both the Senate and the House, they're set to take over powerful congressional committees - and that has the Bush administration nervous about investigations into the management of the Iraq war, intelligence failures, and the fiasco that was Hurricane Katrina. So, who are a few of the new chairmen and what will be at the top of their agenda? The WSJ has a nice write-up, as does the BBC, and the WaPo devoted a spread today. Here's a brief breakdown of a few of the changes.

Senate Intelligence Committee: Jay Rockefeller (WV) wants to investigate the White House's case for invading Iraq.

Senate Subcommittee on Investigations: Carl Levin (MI) promises to look into no-bid contracts in Iraq, and as likely chair of the Senate Armed Services Committee, may call for a reduction of U.S. troops there.

Now that the Democrats control both the Senate and the House, they’re set to take over powerful congressional committees – and that has the Bush administration nervous about investigations into the management of the Iraq war, intelligence failures, and the fiasco that was Hurricane Katrina. So, who are a few of the new chairmen and what will be at the top of their agenda? The WSJ has a nice write-up, as does the BBC, and the WaPo devoted a spread today. Here’s a brief breakdown of a few of the changes.

Senate Intelligence Committee: Jay Rockefeller (WV) wants to investigate the White House’s case for invading Iraq.

Senate Subcommittee on Investigations: Carl Levin (MI) promises to look into no-bid contracts in Iraq, and as likely chair of the Senate Armed Services Committee, may call for a reduction of U.S. troops there.

Senate Appropriations Committee: Expect Robert Byrd (WV) to balk at more emergency spending bills for the military.

Senate Foreign Relations Committee: Joe Biden (DE) has written publicly about splitting Iraq into three federal regions.

House Foreign Relations Committee: Tom Lantos (CA) wants to push for talks with North Korea and Iran.

House Ways and Means Committee: Charles Rangel (NY) wants more labor and environmental standards in trade agreements and fewer tax incentives for companies that send jobs overseas.

House Committee on Homeland Security: Bennie Thompson (MS) wants to question Michael Chertoff about the lack of reconstruction progress since Hurricane Katrina.

House Government Reform Committee: Henry Waxman (CA) wants to investigate Halliburton’s work in Iraq and oil-company profits.

House Judiciary Committee: John Conyers (MI) may reopen debate over military tribunals and warrantless wiretapping. 

Carolyn O'Hara is a senior editor at Foreign Policy.

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