Morning Brief, Tuesday, November 14

Iraq Bush met with members of the Iraq Study Group yesterday, and word is already leaking out that his administration isn't keen to suddenly adopt a friendlier approach to Iraq's neighbors. Tony Blair said yesterday that any move forward in Iraq must involve the whole Middle East. Gunmen seize more than 100 men from Iraq's ...

Iraq

Bush met with members of the Iraq Study Group yesterday, and word is already leaking out that his administration isn't keen to suddenly adopt a friendlier approach to Iraq's neighbors. Tony Blair said yesterday that any move forward in Iraq must involve the whole Middle East.

Gunmen seize more than 100 men from Iraq's ministry of higher education today.

Iraq

Bush met with members of the Iraq Study Group yesterday, and word is already leaking out that his administration isn't keen to suddenly adopt a friendlier approach to Iraq's neighbors. Tony Blair said yesterday that any move forward in Iraq must involve the whole Middle East.

Gunmen seize more than 100 men from Iraq's ministry of higher education today.

Iran

Bush maintained a hardline against Iran while meeting with Israeli PM Ehud Olmert at the White House yesterday. 

Ahmadinejad says Iran is close to completing its nuclear fuel program, adding that he'll soon send a message to the United States to explain his country's policies. 

U.S.  trade with Vietnam

Bush heads to Hanoi later this week to attend an economic conference, but the House delivered a setback last night when they defeated a bill that would have granted Vietnam normal trade relations with the United States. The State Department just removed Vietnam from its list of countries that violate religious freedoms, also a nod to the upcoming visit.

Elsewhere

The most unsurprising news of the day: Pakistan's involvement in the rise in violence in Afghanistan.

More violence in Darfur. South Africa's parliament backs gay marriages. Japan bans the export of luxury goods – think cars, caviar, and alcohol – to North Korea. 

And Hamas and Fatah are close to a deal on a new prime minister. 

Carolyn O'Hara is a senior editor at Foreign Policy.

More from Foreign Policy

An illustration shows George Kennan, the father of Cold War containment strategy.
An illustration shows George Kennan, the father of Cold War containment strategy.

Is Cold War Inevitable?

A new biography of George Kennan, the father of containment, raises questions about whether the old Cold War—and the emerging one with China—could have been avoided.

U.S. President Joe Biden speaks on the DISCLOSE Act.
U.S. President Joe Biden speaks on the DISCLOSE Act.

So You Want to Buy an Ambassadorship

The United States is the only Western government that routinely rewards mega-donors with top diplomatic posts.

Chinese President Xi jinping  toasts the guests during a banquet marking the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China on September 30, 2019 in Beijing, China.
Chinese President Xi jinping toasts the guests during a banquet marking the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China on September 30, 2019 in Beijing, China.

Can China Pull Off Its Charm Offensive?

Why Beijing’s foreign-policy reset will—or won’t—work out.

Turkish Defense Minister Hulusi Akar chairs a meeting in Ankara, Turkey on Nov. 21, 2022.
Turkish Defense Minister Hulusi Akar chairs a meeting in Ankara, Turkey on Nov. 21, 2022.

Turkey’s Problem Isn’t Sweden. It’s the United States.

Erdogan has focused on Stockholm’s stance toward Kurdish exile groups, but Ankara’s real demand is the end of U.S. support for Kurds in Syria.