Morning Brief, Wednesday, November 22

Robert Kaplan argues in the Washington Post that realism, even after Iraq, won't prevail in American foreign policy:  Hard-core foreign policy realists (the kind who say this country should rarely intervene again, anywhere) are hoping that in the wake of our comeuppance in Iraq things will be going their way.[…] This is nonsense. Our foreign ...

Robert Kaplan argues in the Washington Post that realism, even after Iraq, won't prevail in American foreign policy: 

Hard-core foreign policy realists (the kind who say this country should rarely intervene again, anywhere) are hoping that in the wake of our comeuppance in Iraq things will be going their way.[...] This is nonsense. Our foreign policy is about to experience an adjustment, not a flip-flop.

Middle East

Robert Kaplan argues in the Washington Post that realism, even after Iraq, won't prevail in American foreign policy: 

Hard-core foreign policy realists (the kind who say this country should rarely intervene again, anywhere) are hoping that in the wake of our comeuppance in Iraq things will be going their way.[…] This is nonsense. Our foreign policy is about to experience an adjustment, not a flip-flop.

Middle East

Snipers are not as effective in fighting insurgency as we had hoped. And a bomb goes off inside the Green Zone in an attempt to kill the (Sunni) speaker of parliament. The Brits say they'll be able to hand over Basra to the Iraqis in the spring.

David Ignatius offers lessons from Saudi Arabia:

Like the Saudis, the Iraqis will have to save themselves, working within the authentic political framework of their culture, religion and region. The more we try to substitute our will for theirs, with more American troops or exhortation, the more we enfeeble them. As in Saudi Arabia, we must move slowly but deliberately out of the spotlight and into the shadows, with a sustainable mission of training and advising Iraqi troops.

In Lebanon, yesterday's assassination has produced a fresh crisis. Gemayel is being mourned in the streets. And, to nobody's surprise, Washington's tensions with Syria and Iran have risen. 

Elsewhere 

Following up on the post from yesterday on India and China, Pankaj Mishra offers up his assessment of India: "Gaining Power, Losing Values.

A new oil exporter in Africa: Sao Tome and Principe. We've seen this movie before: "Sao Tome's elected officials portray the oil discoveries as an antidote to the entrenched poverty and flourish grand development plans once the oil starts flowing in a few years' time."

A new report sheds light on incompetence at DHS

The Bull Moose, aka Marshall Wittmann, has left the DLC to be Sen. Joe Lieberman's spokesman.  

Soros warns Germany about its reliance on Russian natural gas.

The U.S. Army makes a new pitch to potential recruits.

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