But can he still get DVDs of Team America?

Message to Dear Leader: No jet skis for you. No leather chaps, no silk PJs, no flat-screen TV. No Courvoisier, either. For the first time ever, the United States is attempting to use trade sanctions to target a specific person: North Korean president Kim Jong-il, who is known for his love of luxury goods (even ...

605899_15TEAM.1.1845.jpg
605899_15TEAM.1.1845.jpg

Message to Dear Leader: No jet skis for you. No leather chaps, no silk PJs, no flat-screen TV. No Courvoisier, either. For the first time ever, the United States is attempting to use trade sanctions to target a specific person: North Korean president Kim Jong-il, who is known for his love of luxury goods (even while his people are starving). The U.S. has proposed a list of items to be banned from North Korea in the wake of the rogue nation's nuclear tests earlier this year. The ban would be administered through the United Nations, which has already imposed sanctions on the shipment of weapons and other military equipment. What I wonder is, if Kim doesn't have cigars, perfumes, and brandy to shower upon his most favored friends, won't they abandon him? Oh wait, I guess that's the point -- to make him "so ronery, oh so ronery..." 

Message to Dear Leader: No jet skis for you. No leather chaps, no silk PJs, no flat-screen TV. No Courvoisier, either. For the first time ever, the United States is attempting to use trade sanctions to target a specific person: North Korean president Kim Jong-il, who is known for his love of luxury goods (even while his people are starving). The U.S. has proposed a list of items to be banned from North Korea in the wake of the rogue nation’s nuclear tests earlier this year. The ban would be administered through the United Nations, which has already imposed sanctions on the shipment of weapons and other military equipment. What I wonder is, if Kim doesn’t have cigars, perfumes, and brandy to shower upon his most favored friends, won’t they abandon him? Oh wait, I guess that’s the point — to make him “so ronery, oh so ronery…” 

Christine Y. Chen is a senior editor at Foreign Policy.

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