Globalization with a light and crusty face

About a month ago, Mark Bittman wrote a piece for the New York Times about Jim Lahey, owner of New York’s Sullivan Street Bakery, who shares how to make bakery-style bread at home with very little effort: no kneading, no fancy oven, just plenty of time. The idea was so appealing and the recipe was ...

605650_bread5.jpg
605650_bread5.jpg

About a month ago, Mark Bittman wrote a piece for the New York Times about Jim Lahey, owner of New York's Sullivan Street Bakery, who shares how to make bakery-style bread at home with very little effort: no kneading, no fancy oven, just plenty of time. The idea was so appealing and the recipe was so simple that the story quickly rose to the top of the Times's most e-mailed articles list.  Now Bittman reports that its popularity has transcended borders and inspired global feedback:

My results with Mr. Lahey’s method have been beyond satisfying. Happily, so have those of most readers. In the last few weeks Jim Lahey’s recipe has been translated into German, baked in Togo, discussed on more than 200 blogs and written about in other newspapers. It has changed the lives (their words, not mine) of veteran and novice bakers.

Now that's what I call good cookin'.

About a month ago, Mark Bittman wrote a piece for the New York Times about Jim Lahey, owner of New York’s Sullivan Street Bakery, who shares how to make bakery-style bread at home with very little effort: no kneading, no fancy oven, just plenty of time. The idea was so appealing and the recipe was so simple that the story quickly rose to the top of the Times‘s most e-mailed articles list.  Now Bittman reports that its popularity has transcended borders and inspired global feedback:

My results with Mr. Lahey’s method have been beyond satisfying. Happily, so have those of most readers. In the last few weeks Jim Lahey’s recipe has been translated into German, baked in Togo, discussed on more than 200 blogs and written about in other newspapers. It has changed the lives (their words, not mine) of veteran and novice bakers.

Now that’s what I call good cookin’.

Christine Y. Chen is a senior editor at Foreign Policy.

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