Morning Brief, Monday, December 11

Iraq and Middle East Mohammed Sawaf/AFP/Getty Images One of the worst incidents of sectarian cleansing yet took place in Iraq on Saturday in the mostly Shiite neighborhood of Hurriya, when Shiite militiamen booted more than 100 Sunni families from their homes. Ironically, the word “hurriya” means “freedom” in Arabic. Al-Qaeda in Iraq has read the ...

605626_hurriya5.jpg
605626_hurriya5.jpg

Iraq and Middle East

Iraq and Middle East



Mohammed Sawaf/AFP/Getty Images

One of the worst incidents of sectarian cleansing yet took place in Iraq on Saturday in the mostly Shiite neighborhood of Hurriya, when Shiite militiamen booted more than 100 Sunni families from their homes. Ironically, the word “hurriya” means “freedom” in Arabic.

Al-Qaeda in Iraq has read the Baker-Hamilton report, and—surprise!—they don’t like it. Apparently Baker is “not enabling the true mujahideen and Muslims from winning the fruits of this blessed jihad.”

Iraq’s president doesn’t like it either, but for different reasons.

Iran’s conference “examining” whether the Holocaust happened or not opened today in Tehran. The Germans countered with their own rebuttal conference, entitled “This is What Happened.”

Hezbollah and its Christian allies have stepped up their efforts to topple the Lebanese government.

Asia

The sixth round of six-party talks over North Korea’s nuclear weapons will begin next week, say the Chinese. “Japan is nothing but an impostor,” responded the North Koreans.

U.S. Treasury Secretary Hank Paulson goes to China this week for a “strategic economic dialogue.” Sebastian Mallaby reflects on China’s currency manipulation.

The U.S. Congress finally passed a bill normalizing American trade relations with Vietnam, soon to be the newest member of the WTO. 

Europe



Global distribution of British expats

The Germans are hot on the trail of a Russian businessman suspected of involvement in the murder of a Russian spy.

A new study finds that 10% of Britons live abroad.

Elsewhere

The death of former Chilean military dictator Augusto Pinochet was met with both cheers and tears in Santiago.

The Taliban is steadily taking over northern Pakistan. 

More from Foreign Policy

Keri Russell as Kate Wyler walks by a State Department Seal from a scene in The Diplomat, a new Netflix show about the foreign service.
Keri Russell as Kate Wyler walks by a State Department Seal from a scene in The Diplomat, a new Netflix show about the foreign service.

At Long Last, the Foreign Service Gets the Netflix Treatment

Keri Russell gets Drexel furniture but no Senate confirmation hearing.

Chinese President Xi Jinping and French President Emmanuel Macron speak in the garden of the governor of Guangdong's residence in Guangzhou, China, on April 7.
Chinese President Xi Jinping and French President Emmanuel Macron speak in the garden of the governor of Guangdong's residence in Guangzhou, China, on April 7.

How Macron Is Blocking EU Strategy on Russia and China

As a strategic consensus emerges in Europe, France is in the way.

Chinese President Jiang Zemin greets U.S. President George W. Bush prior to a meeting of APEC leaders in 2001.
Chinese President Jiang Zemin greets U.S. President George W. Bush prior to a meeting of APEC leaders in 2001.

What the Bush-Obama China Memos Reveal

Newly declassified documents contain important lessons for U.S. China policy.

A girl stands atop a destroyed Russian tank.
A girl stands atop a destroyed Russian tank.

Russia’s Boom Business Goes Bust

Moscow’s arms exports have fallen to levels not seen since the Soviet Union’s collapse.