Going hungry in the land of plenty

The U.S. is supposed to be the land of plenty—a cornucopia of earthly delights where immigrants from all over the world can live the American dream. So why are thousands of American residents struggling to eat a decent meal? A study released yesterday by a Hispanic civil rights group, the National Council of La Raza ...

605341_NCLR_cover5.jpg
605341_NCLR_cover5.jpg

The U.S. is supposed to be the land of plenty—a cornucopia of earthly delights where immigrants from all over the world can live the American dream. So why are thousands of American residents struggling to eat a decent meal?

A study released yesterday by a Hispanic civil rights group, the National Council of La Raza (NCLR) found that 5 percent of Hispanics living in the U.S. regularly go hungry and a further 20 percent do not have sufficient access to nutritious food. Language, legal and cultural obstacles also lead to hunger and malnutrition within the community. According to Janet Murguia, NCLR President and CEO,

Lack of access to resources is forcing far too many Latino families into choices no one should have to make, such as between having a roof over their heads or putting food on the table... A lack of affordable, nutritious food also have devastating health consequences, such as increasing hunger and obesity, affecting not only the Latino community, but the well-being of our entire nation.

The U.S. is supposed to be the land of plenty—a cornucopia of earthly delights where immigrants from all over the world can live the American dream. So why are thousands of American residents struggling to eat a decent meal?

A study released yesterday by a Hispanic civil rights group, the National Council of La Raza (NCLR) found that 5 percent of Hispanics living in the U.S. regularly go hungry and a further 20 percent do not have sufficient access to nutritious food. Language, legal and cultural obstacles also lead to hunger and malnutrition within the community. According to Janet Murguia, NCLR President and CEO,

Lack of access to resources is forcing far too many Latino families into choices no one should have to make, such as between having a roof over their heads or putting food on the table… A lack of affordable, nutritious food also have devastating health consequences, such as increasing hunger and obesity, affecting not only the Latino community, but the well-being of our entire nation.

The study also found that many are missing out on food assistance programs, and that confusing changes in the law have made “lawfully-present immigrants” afraid to ask for food stamps. Non-Hispanic blacks are even worse off than Latinos, with 8 percent going hungry and 22 percent lacking access to healthy food.

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