Ban Ki Moon tries to awaken the UN

Spencer Platt/Getty Images Ban Ki Moon took office as secretary general of the United Nations yesterday, inheriting an organization sullied by inaction in Darfur and the oil-for-food scandal. But Moon’s toughest challenge may be dealing with the UN bureaucracy. His attempt to call his first staff meeting for 8 am today was allegedly denied: According ...

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605148_bankimoon_05.jpg

Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Ban Ki Moon took office as secretary general of the United Nations yesterday, inheriting an organization sullied by inaction in Darfur and the oil-for-food scandal. But Moon's toughest challenge may be dealing with the UN bureaucracy. His attempt to call his first staff meeting for 8 am today was allegedly denied:

According to a UN source, staff informed him that the Korean-style early start would create too many difficulties and he was forced to reschedule his arrival to 9.30 am.



Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Ban Ki Moon took office as secretary general of the United Nations yesterday, inheriting an organization sullied by inaction in Darfur and the oil-for-food scandal. But Moon’s toughest challenge may be dealing with the UN bureaucracy. His attempt to call his first staff meeting for 8 am today was allegedly denied:

According to a UN source, staff informed him that the Korean-style early start would create too many difficulties and he was forced to reschedule his arrival to 9.30 am.

The former South Korean foreign minister has already made two appointments, naming Indian diplomat Vijay Nambiar as his chief of staff and Haitian journalist Michele Montas as his spokeswoman. Other top positions are coveted by Western states, but they will likely be filled by appointees from developing countries.

Despite a rocky start, Ban is already styling himself as the next Tom Cruise:

You could say that I’m a man on a mission, and my mission could be dubbed ‘Operation Restore Trust’ – and trust in the organization and trust between member states and the secretariat. I hope this mission is not mission impossible.

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