Morning Brief, Wednesday, January 3

Iraq and Middle East Iraq’s prime minister is tired of his job, he tells the Wall Street Journal. Free summary at the BBC. Maliki was apparently deeply worried that Saddam would be freed by Sunni insurgents. Iraq will review the sectarian spectacle that took place at Saddam Hussein’s execution.  Europe The euro’s steady climb against ...

605132_maliki_05.jpg
605132_maliki_05.jpg

Iraq and Middle East

Iraq's prime minister is tired of his job, he tells the Wall Street Journal. Free summary at the BBC.

Maliki was apparently deeply worried that Saddam would be freed by Sunni insurgents.

Iraq and Middle East

Iraq’s prime minister is tired of his job, he tells the Wall Street Journal. Free summary at the BBC.

Maliki was apparently deeply worried that Saddam would be freed by Sunni insurgents.

Iraq will review the sectarian spectacle that took place at Saddam Hussein’s execution. 

Europe

The euro’s steady climb against the dollar continues

Asia 

What’s behind China’s apparent new openness to foreign media? The 2008 Olympics, says the Economist. Another component of the Chinese drive to wow journalists: Putting the Olympic torch on the summit of Mt. Everest.

China’s new adoption rules for foreigners have come under fire, but Chinese officials say they’re meant to guarantee “optimal family conditions” for orphaned children. 

The yuan’s appreciation isn’t appreciated by Chinese exporters, who are feeling the bite of a 6% rise against the dollar since 2005. 

Cult worship of Kim Jong Il in North Korea: It’s worse than you think

Elsewhere 

Remnants of the Islamist forces that, until very recently, ruled most of Somalia, keep on fighting near the Kenyan border. Somalia itself remains tense, with doubts about whether the Islamists are really gone.

The U.S. is more reliant on OPEC than ever.

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