Whistleblower 2.0

Can you keep a secret?  Maybe you shouldn’t.  At least, that’s what the creators of WikiLeaks.org think. Modeled after Wikipedia, the new website is a place for people to post uncensored documents and memos that can provide information about questionable behavior in governments or corporations. Primarily targeted at oppressive regimes in the Asia, the Middle ...

604834_topsecret8.jpg
604834_topsecret8.jpg

Can you keep a secret?  Maybe you shouldn't.  At least, that's what the creators of WikiLeaks.org think. Modeled after Wikipedia, the new website is a place for people to post uncensored documents and memos that can provide information about questionable behavior in governments or corporations. Primarily targeted at oppressive regimes in the Asia, the Middle East, former Soviet Union states, and sub-Saharan Africa, it can also be used by whistleblowers in the West who are afraid of the repercussions of speaking out publicly. The forces behind the website, ironically, want to keep their identities secret. But they are said to be political activists and open-source software engineers who don't necessarily believe that Father Knows Best. According to The New Scientist, people who post will be able to protect their identities too: 

Normally an email or a document posted to a website can be traced back to its source because each data packet carries the IP address of the last server that it passed through. To prevent this, WikiLeaks will exploit an anonymising protocol known as The Onion Router (Tor), which routes data through a network of servers that use cryptography to hide the path that the packets took.

Wikileaks is expected to launch sometime next month.

Can you keep a secret?  Maybe you shouldn’t.  At least, that’s what the creators of WikiLeaks.org think. Modeled after Wikipedia, the new website is a place for people to post uncensored documents and memos that can provide information about questionable behavior in governments or corporations. Primarily targeted at oppressive regimes in the Asia, the Middle East, former Soviet Union states, and sub-Saharan Africa, it can also be used by whistleblowers in the West who are afraid of the repercussions of speaking out publicly. The forces behind the website, ironically, want to keep their identities secret. But they are said to be political activists and open-source software engineers who don’t necessarily believe that Father Knows Best. According to The New Scientist, people who post will be able to protect their identities too: 

Normally an email or a document posted to a website can be traced back to its source because each data packet carries the IP address of the last server that it passed through. To prevent this, WikiLeaks will exploit an anonymising protocol known as The Onion Router (Tor), which routes data through a network of servers that use cryptography to hide the path that the packets took.

Wikileaks is expected to launch sometime next month.

Christine Y. Chen is a senior editor at Foreign Policy.

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