Iranian blogger just wants to be sedated

Flickr: kavehkhkh Iranian blog king Hossein Derakhshan, better known as Hoder, was treated to a fawning profile in Haaretz on Friday. Despite having to sign a false confession before relocating to Canada and watching as the regime blocked his super-popular blog (www.hoder.com), Derakhshan, 31, remains unperturbed. He expresses his enthusiasm for the Iranian Revolution (much like Foucault, he ...

604838_hoder_05.jpg
604838_hoder_05.jpg

Flickr: kavehkhkh



Flickr: kavehkhkh

Iranian blog king Hossein Derakhshan, better known as Hoder, was treated to a fawning profile in Haaretz on Friday. Despite having to sign a false confession before relocating to Canada and watching as the regime blocked his super-popular blog (www.hoder.com), Derakhshan, 31, remains unperturbed. He expresses his enthusiasm for the Iranian Revolution (much like Foucault, he thinks it embodied “a post-modernist idea”), labels the fact that women are forced to wear the hijab “an external matter,” and describes Iran, after Israel, as the freest country in the Middle East. As for its anti-Jewish president, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, Derakhshan describes him as an Iranian George W. Bush: a nuisance that nobody likes anyway.

But where Derakhshan’s bourgeois complacency really gets alarming is in his description of Tehran’s nightlife:

I love Tehran. It’s a huge, lively and varied city that’s alive 24 hours a day. The restaurants are open until four in the morning.” In fact, it’s rather similar to Tel Aviv, he says, in terms of both architecture and character. “Young people in Tel Aviv and Tehran are listening to the same music and using the same drugs.”

Is Derakhshan completely opiated? Doesn’t he understand the nature of the Faustian bargain between middle class and regime in Iran? It’s the classic example of a tottering authoritarian regime creating a radical disjuncture between political and civil society, granting the bourgeoisie the latter and sealing off the former.

Perhaps Iranian blog-surfers aren’t missing much after all.

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