Israeli parents win use of son’s sperm

After a four-year legal battle, an Israeli couple has won the right to use their deceased son’s sperm to impregnate a woman and continue the family line. The couple’s son, a soldier, died in 2002 at the age of 20 without leaving a will, much less instructions about what to do with his sperm. The hospital storing ...

604712_Sperm25.jpg
604712_Sperm25.jpg

After a four-year legal battle, an Israeli couple has won the right to use their deceased son's sperm to impregnate a woman and continue the family line.

The couple's son, a soldier, died in 2002 at the age of 20 without leaving a will, much less instructions about what to do with his sperm. The hospital storing the extracted sperm said that only a spouse could request to have it released, but the man was single when he died. More than 200 women offered to be impregnated, and the parents have a selected a 25-year-old woman to be the mother.

Beware, males: Your sperm can be used without your consent. Make sure to include sperm-related instructions in your living will.

After a four-year legal battle, an Israeli couple has won the right to use their deceased son’s sperm to impregnate a woman and continue the family line.

The couple’s son, a soldier, died in 2002 at the age of 20 without leaving a will, much less instructions about what to do with his sperm. The hospital storing the extracted sperm said that only a spouse could request to have it released, but the man was single when he died. More than 200 women offered to be impregnated, and the parents have a selected a 25-year-old woman to be the mother.

Beware, males: Your sperm can be used without your consent. Make sure to include sperm-related instructions in your living will.

Preeti Aroon was copy chief at Foreign Policy from 2009 to 2016 and was an FP assistant editor from 2007 to 2009. Twitter: @pjaroonFP

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