A post in which I suck up to my employers

The Financial Times’ Rebecca Knight has a story on the Fletcher School and why it’s better than sliced bread: It may not have been on purpose, but the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy ? the oldest graduate school of international relations in the US ? has suddenly found itself in the executive education business. ...

By , a professor of international politics at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University and co-host of the Space the Nation podcast.

The Financial Times' Rebecca Knight has a story on the Fletcher School and why it's better than sliced bread: It may not have been on purpose, but the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy ? the oldest graduate school of international relations in the US ? has suddenly found itself in the executive education business. Last year, Microsoft and Raytheon, as well as a non-profit group, approached the school, at Tufts University in Massachusetts, to develop customised programmes for their mid- to upper-level professionals. The programmes, which involved courses on international political and economic affairs, were a big hit. This year, Fletcher has three repeat customers on its hands and is ?quietly and cautiously? working to attract others, according to school officials. Executive education programmes ? which have in the past been the domain of business schools ? are typically marketed to companies as a way to hone their workers? skills with courses in finance, marketing, and sales. But, according to Stephen Bosworth, the dean of Fletcher, companies nowadays are in search of more than management refresher courses. Rather, they are looking for ways to boost their executives? knowledge of international politics, culture and business. Fletcher?s programmes are ideal for those companies seeking to ?upgrade the globalisation skills? of key employees, says Mr Bosworth. ?The rationale for all of this is the perceived need for a greater understanding of the political, economic, and cultural context within which these companies are operating,? he says. The programmes, which are conducted by Fletcher and Tufts faculty, are individually tailored, depending on their varying needs and specifications of the companies. For instance, Microsoft asked for a distillation of the school?s overall international curriculum, while Raytheon, the military contractor, requested a programme on political, economic and cultural issues for operating in the Middle East. Deborah Nutter, senior associate dean and professor at Fletcher, says the school?s strength in diplomatic training is what gives it the edge in the executive education realm. ?From the beginning, we have educated global leaders in all sectors,? she says. Note to self: put "educated global leader" somewhere on cv. [Since you have made exactly zero contribution to these programs, is that justified?--ed. Hey, all's fair in love and resumes.] UPDATE: More good financial news for Tufts.

The Financial Times’ Rebecca Knight has a story on the Fletcher School and why it’s better than sliced bread:

It may not have been on purpose, but the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy ? the oldest graduate school of international relations in the US ? has suddenly found itself in the executive education business. Last year, Microsoft and Raytheon, as well as a non-profit group, approached the school, at Tufts University in Massachusetts, to develop customised programmes for their mid- to upper-level professionals. The programmes, which involved courses on international political and economic affairs, were a big hit. This year, Fletcher has three repeat customers on its hands and is ?quietly and cautiously? working to attract others, according to school officials. Executive education programmes ? which have in the past been the domain of business schools ? are typically marketed to companies as a way to hone their workers? skills with courses in finance, marketing, and sales. But, according to Stephen Bosworth, the dean of Fletcher, companies nowadays are in search of more than management refresher courses. Rather, they are looking for ways to boost their executives? knowledge of international politics, culture and business. Fletcher?s programmes are ideal for those companies seeking to ?upgrade the globalisation skills? of key employees, says Mr Bosworth. ?The rationale for all of this is the perceived need for a greater understanding of the political, economic, and cultural context within which these companies are operating,? he says. The programmes, which are conducted by Fletcher and Tufts faculty, are individually tailored, depending on their varying needs and specifications of the companies. For instance, Microsoft asked for a distillation of the school?s overall international curriculum, while Raytheon, the military contractor, requested a programme on political, economic and cultural issues for operating in the Middle East. Deborah Nutter, senior associate dean and professor at Fletcher, says the school?s strength in diplomatic training is what gives it the edge in the executive education realm. ?From the beginning, we have educated global leaders in all sectors,? she says.

Note to self: put “educated global leader” somewhere on cv. [Since you have made exactly zero contribution to these programs, is that justified?–ed. Hey, all’s fair in love and resumes.] UPDATE: More good financial news for Tufts.

Daniel W. Drezner is a professor of international politics at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University and co-host of the Space the Nation podcast. Twitter: @dandrezner

More from Foreign Policy

Newspapers in Tehran feature on their front page news about the China-brokered deal between Iran and Saudi Arabia to restore ties, signed in Beijing the previous day, on March, 11 2023.
Newspapers in Tehran feature on their front page news about the China-brokered deal between Iran and Saudi Arabia to restore ties, signed in Beijing the previous day, on March, 11 2023.

Saudi-Iranian Détente Is a Wake-Up Call for America

The peace plan is a big deal—and it’s no accident that China brokered it.

Austin and Gallant stand at podiums side by side next to each others' national flags.
Austin and Gallant stand at podiums side by side next to each others' national flags.

The U.S.-Israel Relationship No Longer Makes Sense

If Israel and its supporters want the country to continue receiving U.S. largesse, they will need to come up with a new narrative.

Russian President Vladimir Putin lays flowers at the Moscow Kremlin Wall in the Alexander Garden during an event marking Defender of the Fatherland Day in Moscow.
Russian President Vladimir Putin lays flowers at the Moscow Kremlin Wall in the Alexander Garden during an event marking Defender of the Fatherland Day in Moscow.

Putin Is Trapped in the Sunk-Cost Fallacy of War

Moscow is grasping for meaning in a meaningless invasion.

An Iranian man holds a newspaper reporting the China-brokered deal between Iran and Saudi Arabia to restore ties, in Tehran on March 11.
An Iranian man holds a newspaper reporting the China-brokered deal between Iran and Saudi Arabia to restore ties, in Tehran on March 11.

How China’s Saudi-Iran Deal Can Serve U.S. Interests

And why there’s less to Beijing’s diplomatic breakthrough than meets the eye.