Morning Brief, Tuesday, January 23

Washington  Getty Images Key Republican Senator John Warner introduced a bipartisan resolution opposing the surge on the eve of Bush’s State of the Union address. Warner has expressed his doubts about Iraq before, but rarely taken action; maybe he was just waiting to kick the president when he’s down. The man giving the Democratic response ...

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604640_john_warner_25.jpg

Washington 

Washington 

Getty Images

Key Republican Senator John Warner introduced a bipartisan resolution opposing the surge on the eve of Bush’s State of the Union address. Warner has expressed his doubts about Iraq before, but rarely taken action; maybe he was just waiting to kick the president when he’s down.

The man giving the Democratic response to Bush’s speech tonight? Virginia’s freshman Senator James Webb, a former Republican. 

Liz Cheney emerges from her cocoon to bash Hillary Clinton’s wishy-washy stance on Iraq.  

Middle East

Hezbollah and its Christian allies escalated their campaign to bring down the Lebanese government with roadblocks, burning tires, and a general strike.

Security forces have captured around 600 fighters and more than a dozen leaders of the Mahdi Army militia, the armed wing of Moqtada al-Sadr’s radical Shiite movement in Iraq.

A rare display of unity in Istanbul as thousands mourned Hrant Dink, a Turkish-Armenian editor who was murdered outside his office last week.

Europe

U.S. productivity growth lagged behind that of the EU and Japan last year. 

French presidential candidate Nicolas Sarkozy promises an “economic revolution” if he is elected. 

Asia

Yes, China at last admits, we did happen to blow up our own weather satellite. Fear not.

Chinese bloggers have an enemy, and it is Starbucks. 

Elsewhere 

Ethiopian troops have begun withdrawing from Somalia. Yesterday a top leader of the defeated Council of Islamic Courts surrendered in Kenya.

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