Morning Brief, Thursday, January 25

Iraq and Middle East The “mayor” of Sadr City doesn’t want any trouble with the United States. The Senate Foreign Relations Committee approved a resolution condemning the surge as “not in the national interest.” Chuck Hagel was the only Republican to vote for the measure. In Paris, the beleaguered ebanese government asked donors for financial ...

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604540_story.sens_.gi_05.jpg

Iraq and Middle East

The "mayor" of Sadr City doesn't want any trouble with the United States.

The Senate Foreign Relations Committee approved a resolution condemning the surge as "not in the national interest." Chuck Hagel was the only Republican to vote for the measure.

Iraq and Middle East

The “mayor” of Sadr City doesn’t want any trouble with the United States.

The Senate Foreign Relations Committee approved a resolution condemning the surge as “not in the national interest.” Chuck Hagel was the only Republican to vote for the measure.

In Paris, the beleaguered ebanese government asked donors for financial assistance.

Europe 

Apple’s iTunes is illegal, says Norway’s consumer ombudsman. 

Speaking from Davos, German PM Angela Merkel called for tougher controls on emissions. 

Asia 

India wants the U.S. and Europe to make major trade concessions.

As China’s president heads to Khartoum, Chinese officials are defending their country’s behavior in Africa.

Chinese journalists have a way to pay the bills: blackmail.

It’s not just Iraq. The Bush administration has a new strategy for Afghanistan, too.

Elsewhere

Georgian and the United States cooperated in 2005 to nab a Russian man selling a bit of bomb-grade uranium.

U.N. peacekeepers in Haiti are now operating against armed gangs.

Nigerian militants seized Chinese workers, bringing to 100 the number of foreigners seized in Nigeria recently.

The defense minister of Ecuador was killed in a plane crash.

A new U.S. weapon makes you feel as if you’re on fire. 

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