Morning Brief, Wednesday, January 31

Iraq This just in: the United States is wasting millions of dollars in Iraq. Europe The investigation into the murder of former Russian spook Alexander Litvinenko wraps up as Scotland Yard passes the baton to the Crown Prosecution Service. ABC’s Brian Ross reports that it’s because British police discovered “a ‘hot’ teapot at London’s Millennium ...

604381_bobbies_05.jpg
604381_bobbies_05.jpg

Iraq

This just in: the United States is wasting millions of dollars in Iraq.

Europe

Iraq

This just in: the United States is wasting millions of dollars in Iraq.

Europe

The investigation into the murder of former Russian spook Alexander Litvinenko wraps up as Scotland Yard passes the baton to the Crown Prosecution Service. ABC’s Brian Ross reports that it’s because British police discovered “a ‘hot’ teapot at London’s Millennium Hotel with an off-the-charts reading for Polonium-210, the radioactive material used in the killing.” Ross says that the Russian government will be fingered for the hit.

Germany has issued warrants for the arrest of 13 CIA operatives accused of wrongly grabbing Khalid al-Masri, a German citizen, and dumping him in prison of Afghanistan.

Turkish police arrested 47 suspected al Qaeda operatives on Monday. (More terrorism-related arrests in Britain.)

Washington

Republican Senators John McCain and Lindsey Graham are leading rearguard actions to salvage the Bush administration’s troop surge in Iraq.

Asia

China’s stock market may be headed for a crash, warns the Financial Times. The country’s main stock index dropped nearly 5 percent on the news.

Elsewhere

Human Rights Watch says Nigerian officials are squandering oil riches. Shocking. Full report here.

Hackers and “script kiddiez” around the world are gunning for Vista, Microsoft’s new operating system. Bring it on, says Bill Gates (more or less).

Fidel Castro and Hugo Chávez appeared together on Cuban state TV. Castro looks healthier.

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