Morning Brief, Monday, February 12

2008 Democratic Senator Barack Obama evoked the spirit of Abraham Lincoln in formally announcing his bid for U.S. president in Springfield, Illinois. He followed it up with a coveted appearance on 60 Minutes, but that didn’t stop Australian Prime Minister John Howard from attacking the candidate’s stance on Iraq. Middle East Iran is supplying weapons ...

2008

Democratic Senator Barack Obama evoked the spirit of Abraham Lincoln in formally announcing his bid for U.S. president in Springfield, Illinois. He followed it up with a coveted appearance on 60 Minutes, but that didn't stop Australian Prime Minister John Howard from attacking the candidate's stance on Iraq.

Middle East

2008

Democratic Senator Barack Obama evoked the spirit of Abraham Lincoln in formally announcing his bid for U.S. president in Springfield, Illinois. He followed it up with a coveted appearance on 60 Minutes, but that didn’t stop Australian Prime Minister John Howard from attacking the candidate’s stance on Iraq.

Middle East

Iran is supplying weapons for attacks on U.S. troops, says the Bush administration. No, we’re not, retorts Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. No word from Ahmadinejad on whether Iran’s nuclear program has made technical progress, but Iranian diplomats are showing a willingness to talk.

Huge bombings in Baghdad on the anniversary of the destruction of a Shiite shrine. 

It’ll be the rope for Taha Hussein Ramadan, the third aide to Saddam sentenced to hang for Dujail.

Europe 

UK officials denied accusations that cooked turkeys shipped from a farm contaminated with bird flu are a health risk.

Turnout in this weekend’s referendum was below the required 50 percent, but Portugal plans to make abortion legal regardless.

Blinking back tears, French Socialist party candidate Ségolène Royal unveiled her 100-point platform.

Asia

The six-party talks are in danger of collapse over North Korean demands. 

U.S. Defense Secretary Robert Gates, fresh from parrying harsh anti-U.S. rhetoric from Russian President Vladimir Putin in Munich, flew to Islamabad to offer support for Pakistan’s president, Pervez Musharraf.

Taiwan dropped the name “China” from two of its state-run businesses, a move bound to provoke Beijing.

Elsewhere 

Ninety percent of U.S. cocaine comes though FARC, the Colombian drug organization and guerrilla group. 

Oil prices fell again on the news that OPEC doesn’t plan production cuts.

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