Morning Brief, Wednesday, February 28

Markets dip The Dow Jones Industrial Average slid 416.02 points yesterday, following a nearly 9 percent fall by the Shanghai stock market that prompted a selloff in markets around the world. A computer glitch made the Dow’s drop appear more sudden than it was, though it was till the market’s biggest absolute decline since September ...

603693_070227_dow_05.jpg
603693_070227_dow_05.jpg

Markets dip

The Dow Jones Industrial Average slid 416.02 points yesterday, following a nearly 9 percent fall by the Shanghai stock market that prompted a selloff in markets around the world. A computer glitch made the Dow's drop appear more sudden than it was, though it was till the market's biggest absolute decline since September 17, 2001. Markets recovered by almost 4 percent in Shanghai and Shenzen today, but declined elsewhere. Look for an interesting performance by U.S. Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke in Congressional hearings today.

Middle East

Markets dip

The Dow Jones Industrial Average slid 416.02 points yesterday, following a nearly 9 percent fall by the Shanghai stock market that prompted a selloff in markets around the world. A computer glitch made the Dow’s drop appear more sudden than it was, though it was till the market’s biggest absolute decline since September 17, 2001. Markets recovered by almost 4 percent in Shanghai and Shenzen today, but declined elsewhere. Look for an interesting performance by U.S. Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke in Congressional hearings today.

Middle East

Today’s other big news: The United States may talk with Iran and Syria during two regional conferences on Iraq. The Washington foreign policy establishment is ecstatic.

U.S. troops seized suspected leaders of Shiite death squads in Sadr City, Baghdad.

Europe

Voter registration in France is way up as presidential contenders compete for minority votes in the Paris suburbs. Don’t write off the surging François Bayrou, a dark horse candidate from a small centrist party in Parliament.

Airbus could cut as many as 10,000 workers. 

Asia

Think Chinese stock markets are dangerous? Try Chinese trains

How strong is the Taliban? Also, interesting new analysis of the Taliban’s suicide bombing strategy.

Elsewhere

Some 15,000 Somalis fled Mogadishu in February. 

Actress Angelina Jolie, soon to be a fellow at New York’s Council on Foreign Relations, calls for action in Darfur. The International Criminal Court got the ball rolling yesterday with an indictment of two key players for war crimes.

Fidel Castro is feeling frisky.

U.S. paper AsianWeek is facing fierce criticism for running a column with the name “Why I Hate Blacks.”

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