Qaddafi swallows a bitter pill

MAHMUD TURKIA/AFP/Getty In a rare discussion with western observers, Libyan premier Colonel Muammar el-Qaddafi has both denounced and accepted global capitalism. Speaking at a seminar marking the thirtieth birthday of his Jamahiriyah (roughly translated: “state of the masses”) political system, Gaddafi had scathing words for the west that shunned him for decades. The prevailing powers ...

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603593_k1_05.jpg

MAHMUD TURKIA/AFP/Getty

In a rare discussion with western observers, Libyan premier Colonel Muammar el-Qaddafi has both denounced and accepted global capitalism. Speaking at a seminar marking the thirtieth birthday of his Jamahiriyah (roughly translated: "state of the masses") political system, Gaddafi had scathing words for the west that shunned him for decades.

The prevailing powers today are in the hands of those who have economic and military power which puts fears in others. They can make you starve. They can close the doors for your exports of raw materials such as coffee and oil."

MAHMUD TURKIA/AFP/Getty

In a rare discussion with western observers, Libyan premier Colonel Muammar el-Qaddafi has both denounced and accepted global capitalism. Speaking at a seminar marking the thirtieth birthday of his Jamahiriyah (roughly translated: “state of the masses”) political system, Gaddafi had scathing words for the west that shunned him for decades.

The prevailing powers today are in the hands of those who have economic and military power which puts fears in others. They can make you starve. They can close the doors for your exports of raw materials such as coffee and oil.”

In spite of such venom, the man who has ruled Libya for nearly forty years promises to lead his country into the world economy. “Libya is a part of this changing world which is dominated by globalization,” he mused. “We can criticize them [the IMF and World Bank], but we cannot be outside these institutions.” Could his change of heart be the influence of his son?

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