Morning Brief, Friday, March 9

ANTONIO SCORZA/AFP Latin America President Bush is finding the crowds not so welcoming on his Latin America trip. In Guatemala, for instance, Mayan priests say they will need to purify their sacred archaelogical sites after Bush’s visit.  Peak oil in Mexico or “government interference“? Ecuador, banana republic. United States Is Chuck Hagel, the darling of ...

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603452_070309_brazil_05.jpg

ANTONIO SCORZA/AFP

Latin America

President Bush is finding the crowds not so welcoming on his Latin America trip. In Guatemala, for instance, Mayan priests say they will need to purify their sacred archaelogical sites after Bush's visit. 

ANTONIO SCORZA/AFP

Latin America

President Bush is finding the crowds not so welcoming on his Latin America trip. In Guatemala, for instance, Mayan priests say they will need to purify their sacred archaelogical sites after Bush’s visit. 

Peak oil in Mexico or “government interference“?

Ecuador, banana republic.

United States

Is Chuck Hagel, the darling of the foreign-policy establishment, running for president?

The FBI makes errors in many of the sercret requests it files for information on U.S. citizens, according to an audit by the U.S. Justice Department’s inspector general.

Middle East

The United States is making more positive noises about bilateral discussions with Iran and Syria at this weekend’s regional talks in Baghdad. The EU already plans to resume diplomatic contacts with Syria.

Europe

The EU will require member states to get 20 percent of their energy from renewable sources by 2020. 

Deny the Armenian genocide in Switzerland, and you’re breaking the law.

Greek Cypriots tore down a concrete wall dividing their side of the capital Nicosia from the Turkish population … and replaced it with aluminum barriers.

Independence for Kosovo? It’s complicated.

Hard-liners are winning the elections in Northern Ireland. 

Asia

China’s Communist Party introduced a draft law that calls private property “the urgent demand of the people.” The Economist calls it a “breakthrough.” International business is less excited about a second new law that would raise taxes on foreign companies operating in China.

Q: Where will China stash its more than $1 trillion dollars in foreign cash? A: Wherever it wants.

Worst “ceasefire” ever in Sri Lanka.

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