Morning Brief, Monday, March 19

United States Al Gore’s thinner. Is he running for president?  The Democratic chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee says he will demand subpoenas for top White House aides over the burgeoning fired U.S attorneys scandal. Middle East It’s the fourth anniversary of the start of the Iraq War today. How’s it going? For one, just ...

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603226_070319_iraq_05.jpg

United States

Al Gore's thinner. Is he running for president

The Democratic chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee says he will demand subpoenas for top White House aides over the burgeoning fired U.S attorneys scandal.

United States

Al Gore’s thinner. Is he running for president

The Democratic chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee says he will demand subpoenas for top White House aides over the burgeoning fired U.S attorneys scandal.

Middle East

It’s the fourth anniversary of the start of the Iraq War today. How’s it going? For one, just 18 percent of Iraqis trust U.S. forces, according to a new poll. And we already know who’s winning.

DAVID FURST/AFP

Israel’s prime minister, unimpressed by the new national unity cabinet, will only speak to the Palestinian president. But Norway is good to go.

The Washington Post‘s Anthony Shadid is writing the epitaph for Egypt’s struggling democracy movement.

Europe

Methane gas exploded in a coal mine in Siberia, Russia. Death toll unknown.

Finland’s ruling Centre Party withstood a serious election challenge. 

France’s elections aren’t just elite affairs anymore, the Christian Science Monitor reports

Asia

A roadside bomb hit a U.S. Embassy convoy in Kabul, injuring several.

North Korea and the United States have struck a deal over $25 million in frozen bank funds. The amount would be a rounding error for the Pentagon, but it’s a big deal to Kim Jong Il.

China intends to stand up its own competitor to Boeing and Airbus

Elsewhere

Migrant workers in the United States sent home more than $62 billion in remittances in 2006, mostly to Latin America. 

Brazil’s most prominent televangelists are in trouble with Miami police. 

Is your PC one of the estimated six million worldwide that are part of a bot network? 

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