China’s nail house rules

Last week’s big viral image on the web was this astonishing photograph of what is known in Chinese as a “nail house“—defined by China blogger Lyn Jeffery as “the residences of urbanites whose neighborhoods have been ‘moved’ 动迁 and who are the last hold-outs–they stick out like nails in an otherwise modernized environment.” Now we ...

603104_070322_nailhouse_05.jpg
603104_070322_nailhouse_05.jpg

Last week's big viral image on the web was this astonishing photograph of what is known in Chinese as a "nail house"—defined by China blogger Lyn Jeffery as "the residences of urbanites whose neighborhoods have been 'moved' 动迁 and who are the last hold-outs--they stick out like nails in an otherwise modernized environment."

Now we know the story behind the photo. The woman owner of the house wouldn't budge until she was given an equally-spacious flat in the new apartment complex going up on the site. Notes Jeffery:

According to Chongqing law, says the [China Legal Daily] article, there are three possible ways to compensate owners in this type of situation: 1) provide housing on the same spot; 2) provide housing in another spot; 3) provide a sum of money. The city is only willing to provide Ms. Wu, the resident, with the third option, but she is not willing to accept a sum of money.

Last week’s big viral image on the web was this astonishing photograph of what is known in Chinese as a “nail house“—defined by China blogger Lyn Jeffery as “the residences of urbanites whose neighborhoods have been ‘moved’ 动迁 and who are the last hold-outs–they stick out like nails in an otherwise modernized environment.”

Now we know the story behind the photo. The woman owner of the house wouldn’t budge until she was given an equally-spacious flat in the new apartment complex going up on the site. Notes Jeffery:

According to Chongqing law, says the [China Legal Daily] article, there are three possible ways to compensate owners in this type of situation: 1) provide housing on the same spot; 2) provide housing in another spot; 3) provide a sum of money. The city is only willing to provide Ms. Wu, the resident, with the third option, but she is not willing to accept a sum of money.

Even in quasi Communist China, you see, there are limited protections for land owners. But not many: China ranks 45th in the world in terms of strongest safeguarding of property rights, according to the latest International Property Rights Index (pdf) put out by the Property Rights Alliance, a lobbying group in Washington. (Thanks to Cato for the link.)

The top ten countries are:

  • Norway at #1
  • The Netherlands at #2
  • Denmark, Sweden, New Zealand, United Kingdom, Germany, and Australia tied for third
  • Switzerland and Austria tied for ninth

The United States shares 14th place with Canada and Ireland. Last on the list of 70 countries? Lowly, land-stealing Bangladesh.

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