Morning Brief, Thursday, March 29

Jonathan Ernst/Getty Images 2008 Is former U.S. Senator Fred Thompson running for president? He’d give Rudy Giuliani a run for his money as the “Law & Order” candidate. Middle East  Iran says it might not release a female British sailor after all, citing the UK’s “incorrect attitude” toward the crisis.  Saudi Arabia’s King Abdullah decried ...

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602961_070328_thompson_05.jpg

Jonathan Ernst/Getty Images

2008

Is former U.S. Senator Fred Thompson running for president? He'd give Rudy Giuliani a run for his money as the "Law & Order" candidate.

Jonathan Ernst/Getty Images

2008

Is former U.S. Senator Fred Thompson running for president? He’d give Rudy Giuliani a run for his money as the “Law & Order” candidate.

Middle East 

Iran says it might not release a female British sailor after all, citing the UK’s “incorrect attitude” toward the crisis. 

Saudi Arabia’s King Abdullah decried the U.S. occupation of Iraq as “illegitimate” and called for Arab unity at this week’s annual Arab League summit in Riyadh.

Meet Ryan Crocker, the United States’ seasoned new ambassador to Iraq. 

U.S. President George W. Bush promised no surrender in his fight with Congress over Iraq policy.

Europe

Germany’s unemployment rate fell by a significant amount in February. 

The Czech Republic agreed to open talks with the United States on a proposed U.S. missile shield that has aroused controversy in Europe. 

The EU talks with Turkey today after a long freeze in accession negotiations.

Asia

Russia and China set their sights on Mars.

South Korean business and political leaders fear being squeezed economically by Japan and China. (This just in: the United States wants China to open its markets.)

Young Sikh men are abandoning long hair and turbans in droves, the New York Times reports.

Tiny, turbulent Kyrgyzstan has a new prime minister.

Elsewhere 

Cuba’s Fidel Castro emerged to claim that U.S. plans to fuel more cars with ethanol would kill more than 3 billion people.

Uganda’s unique success at fighting AIDS may be coming to an end.

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