Extra! Extra! Read all about it!

iStockphoto.com These days, there’s no shortage of bad news about bad news. Media watchers in the United States are ringing the death knell for the newspaper industry, as newsrooms are laying off round after round of employees, circulation is slipping, ad sales are down, and readers are flocking to the Internet. Large newspaper corporations are ...

602948_070330_newspapers_05.jpg
602948_070330_newspapers_05.jpg

iStockphoto.com

These days, there's no shortage of bad news about bad news. Media watchers in the United States are ringing the death knell for the newspaper industry, as newsrooms are laying off round after round of employees, circulation is slipping, ad sales are down, and readers are flocking to the Internet. Large newspaper corporations are shedding assets, investors are complaining about diminishing returns. Things don't look so hot right now.

Or do they? The Paris-based World Editors Forum, Reuters, and polling firm Zogby have just released their first global Trends in Newsrooms report, and surprisingly, the results show that the vast majority—85 percent—of editors are optimistic about the future of newspapers. This is not to say that they have their heads stuck in the sand. Forty percent believe that ten years from now, people will most commonly get their news from the Internet (35 percent think print will still dominate). The survey also finds that eight out of ten respondents welcome new media's ascent with open arms.

iStockphoto.com

These days, there’s no shortage of bad news about bad news. Media watchers in the United States are ringing the death knell for the newspaper industry, as newsrooms are laying off round after round of employees, circulation is slipping, ad sales are down, and readers are flocking to the Internet. Large newspaper corporations are shedding assets, investors are complaining about diminishing returns. Things don’t look so hot right now.

Or do they? The Paris-based World Editors Forum, Reuters, and polling firm Zogby have just released their first global Trends in Newsrooms report, and surprisingly, the results show that the vast majority—85 percent—of editors are optimistic about the future of newspapers. This is not to say that they have their heads stuck in the sand. Forty percent believe that ten years from now, people will most commonly get their news from the Internet (35 percent think print will still dominate). The survey also finds that eight out of ten respondents welcome new media’s ascent with open arms.

Two-thirds of the 435 respondents, all senior staff from newspapers around the world (half from Europe), think that opinion and analysis pages will become more important in the future. Presumably, that’s because even competing wire services tend to cover the same reported news. But with every Dick, Tom, and Harry blogging about their personal opinions in cyberspace, it’s the columnists from brand-name publications whose opinions will continue to carry more weight.

Christine Y. Chen is a senior editor at Foreign Policy.
Tag: Media

More from Foreign Policy

An illustration shows George Kennan, the father of Cold War containment strategy.
An illustration shows George Kennan, the father of Cold War containment strategy.

Is Cold War Inevitable?

A new biography of George Kennan, the father of containment, raises questions about whether the old Cold War—and the emerging one with China—could have been avoided.

U.S. President Joe Biden speaks on the DISCLOSE Act.
U.S. President Joe Biden speaks on the DISCLOSE Act.

So You Want to Buy an Ambassadorship

The United States is the only Western government that routinely rewards mega-donors with top diplomatic posts.

Chinese President Xi jinping  toasts the guests during a banquet marking the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China on September 30, 2019 in Beijing, China.
Chinese President Xi jinping toasts the guests during a banquet marking the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China on September 30, 2019 in Beijing, China.

Can China Pull Off Its Charm Offensive?

Why Beijing’s foreign-policy reset will—or won’t—work out.

Turkish Defense Minister Hulusi Akar chairs a meeting in Ankara, Turkey on Nov. 21, 2022.
Turkish Defense Minister Hulusi Akar chairs a meeting in Ankara, Turkey on Nov. 21, 2022.

Turkey’s Problem Isn’t Sweden. It’s the United States.

Erdogan has focused on Stockholm’s stance toward Kurdish exile groups, but Ankara’s real demand is the end of U.S. support for Kurds in Syria.