Morning Brief, Thursday, April 12

Source: PBS NewsHour Middle East Breaking: An explosion struck the cafeteria of Iraq’s parliament building, which is inside the Green Zone in Baghdad (the white spot on the map at right). No solid figures on casualties yet. Is it any surprise the Sadrist faction wants to pull out of parliament? The U.S. military has paid ...

602652_070412_greenzone_05.jpg
602652_070412_greenzone_05.jpg


Source: PBS NewsHour

Middle East



Source: PBS NewsHour

Middle East

Breaking: An explosion struck the cafeteria of Iraq’s parliament building, which is inside the Green Zone in Baghdad (the white spot on the map at right). No solid figures on casualties yet. Is it any surprise the Sadrist faction wants to pull out of parliament?

The U.S. military has paid over $32 million in compensation money to civilians in Iraq and Afghanistan for mistaken killings, the New York Times reports.

Maj. Gen. William B. Caldwell IV, the top U.S. military spokesman in Iraq, said in a press conference on Wednesday that “Iranian intelligence sources have provided to Sunni insurgent groups some support.”

U.S. Secretary of Defense Robert Gates announced Wednesday that tours of duty in Iraq and Afghanistan would be extended to 15 months for troops on active duty.

Europe

Bosnia, responding to U.S. pressure, is revoking the citizenship of hundreds of foreign fighters who settled in the mostly Muslim country after the 1990s civil war.

The euro is soaring against the dollar and yen. 

Nicolas Sarkozy (27 percent) and Ségolène Royal (25) are both gaining ground at the expense of François Bayrou (19) and Jean Le Pen (15), a new poll on France’s presidential elections finds.

Asia

The Indian government is “reviewing” performance appraisal forms that asked female civil servants to list their menstrual history.

Speaking to the Japanese parliament, China’s prime minister called for friendship between the two countries, but asked that Japan own up to its World War II crimes. More analysis here.

Success or capitulation? A look at the North Korea deal

India test-fired a new nuclear-capable missile that would put Chinese cities in reach. 

Elsewhere

The United States’ special envoy to Darfur, Andrew Natsios, defended China’s “subtle diplomacy” toward Sudan. Sen. Joseph Biden of Delaware called for the use of U.S. military force to solve the Darfur problem. 

The International Energy Agency warned that OPEC had tightened oil supplies too far. Prices rose on the news.

Venezuela is moving ahead with plans to take full control of its largest phone company.

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