Thursday Video: Bullfighting season gets under way

Spring is in the air—and in Spain and southern France, that's bad news for bulls. The bullfighting season kickstarted this last weekend with a holiday festival in the Provençal city of Arles; Seville and Madrid will have their celebrations in the coming weeks. This week's Thursday Video offers a glimpse of the pageantry and violence ...

Spring is in the air—and in Spain and southern France, that's bad news for bulls. The bullfighting season kickstarted this last weekend with a holiday festival in the Provençal city of Arles; Seville and Madrid will have their celebrations in the coming weeks. This week's Thursday Video offers a glimpse of the pageantry and violence from the Arles Féria:

Spring is in the air—and in Spain and southern France, that's bad news for bulls. The bullfighting season kickstarted this last weekend with a holiday festival in the Provençal city of Arles; Seville and Madrid will have their celebrations in the coming weeks. This week's Thursday Video offers a glimpse of the pageantry and violence from the Arles Féria:


Corrida
Uploaded by Teoz

Like traditional culture elsewhere in the world, bullfighting—or corrida, as enthusiasts prefer to call it—is facing challenges in adopting to the modern world. Many see the practice as a barbaric blood sport best allowed to go the way of gladiatorial combat. Others are pushing for the ritual to adapt by, say, sparing the bull from the slaughter.

Traditionalists, however, are quick to defend the beauty of a matador demonstrating courage, artistry, and complete domination over a powerful creature. They frequently point to the fact that corrida is covered in the arts section of local newspapers, not sports. Bullfighting is also adapting from within: Among the matadors at Arles this weekend was the first French female to enter the ring with a bull at a major holiday festival. And with 30 million people attending corrida in Spain alone each year, she is likely to have enthusiastic crowds to preform in front of for some time.

More from Foreign Policy

Newspapers in Tehran feature on their front page news about the China-brokered deal between Iran and Saudi Arabia to restore ties, signed in Beijing the previous day, on March, 11 2023.
Newspapers in Tehran feature on their front page news about the China-brokered deal between Iran and Saudi Arabia to restore ties, signed in Beijing the previous day, on March, 11 2023.

Saudi-Iranian Détente Is a Wake-Up Call for America

The peace plan is a big deal—and it’s no accident that China brokered it.

Austin and Gallant stand at podiums side by side next to each others' national flags.
Austin and Gallant stand at podiums side by side next to each others' national flags.

The U.S.-Israel Relationship No Longer Makes Sense

If Israel and its supporters want the country to continue receiving U.S. largesse, they will need to come up with a new narrative.

Russian President Vladimir Putin lays flowers at the Moscow Kremlin Wall in the Alexander Garden during an event marking Defender of the Fatherland Day in Moscow.
Russian President Vladimir Putin lays flowers at the Moscow Kremlin Wall in the Alexander Garden during an event marking Defender of the Fatherland Day in Moscow.

Putin Is Trapped in the Sunk-Cost Fallacy of War

Moscow is grasping for meaning in a meaningless invasion.

An Iranian man holds a newspaper reporting the China-brokered deal between Iran and Saudi Arabia to restore ties, in Tehran on March 11.
An Iranian man holds a newspaper reporting the China-brokered deal between Iran and Saudi Arabia to restore ties, in Tehran on March 11.

How China’s Saudi-Iran Deal Can Serve U.S. Interests

And why there’s less to Beijing’s diplomatic breakthrough than meets the eye.