Now online: How to save the world, in magazine form

The May/June issue of FOREIGN POLICY has hit the web, and what an issue it is. Our humble hope: It just might change the world. The cover package is breathtaking in its scope. Twenty-one leading thinkers—from Garry Kasparov to Christopher Hitchens to Joseph Nye—each offer the one idea they think could make the planet a ...

602343_070423_cover160-frontpage2.jpg
602343_070423_cover160-frontpage2.jpg

The May/June issue of FOREIGN POLICY has hit the web, and what an issue it is. Our humble hope: It just might change the world.

The May/June issue of FOREIGN POLICY has hit the web, and what an issue it is. Our humble hope: It just might change the world.

The cover package is breathtaking in its scope. Twenty-one leading thinkers—from Garry Kasparov to Christopher Hitchens to Joseph Nye—each offer the one idea they think could make the planet a better place. Be it tweaking patent law, bolstering Catholic-Muslim understanding, getting vitamins to the poor, raising taxes, or mobilizing the private sector, there is something here to challenge the complacency of even the most hardened pessimist.

Inside, Marcus Mabry takes a second look at U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, and finds someone far more ambitious yet less cerebral than conventional wisdom holds. Joshua Kurlantzick trains his eye on the global gambling industry and discovers that what happens in Vegas definitely doesn’t stay there. A stunning photo essay, Inside the Digital Dump, should change the way you look at your old broken computer in the garage for good.

Other must-reads: Alvaro Vargas Llosa takes down the Latin American left—and its alleged Western enablers like Joseph Stiglitz and Noam Chomsky—in Return of the Idiot; Prime Numbers finds some alarming statistics on the global prison boom; Princeton’s Sophie Meunier looks at French views of American cultural hyperpuissance; and Micha Odenheimer explores what ultra-Orthodox Jews are reading these days.

And don’t miss Six degrees of honorary degrees, FP‘s Kevin Bacon-inspired take on just how few steps away U.S. President George W. Bush is from some of the globe’s most unsavory characters.

Just 25 big ones gets you access to goodies like this all year-round, so why not subscribe now

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