Senate “mavericks” sit out the supplemental

MANDEL NGAN/AFP The most telling thing about the Senate vote this afternoon on the $124 billion supplemental war spending bill, which happens to require American troops to begin withdrawing from Iraq in October, is who abstained from voting: John McCain, Lindsey Graham, and Tim Johnson. “The Maverick” McCain was either too busy campaigning for president to ...

602268_070426_grahammccain_05.jpg
602268_070426_grahammccain_05.jpg

MANDEL NGAN/AFP

The most telling thing about the Senate vote this afternoon on the $124 billion supplemental war spending bill, which happens to require American troops to begin withdrawing from Iraq in October, is who abstained from voting: John McCain, Lindsey Graham, and Tim Johnson.

"The Maverick" McCain was either too busy campaigning for president to return and vote on the most important and contentious issue facing Congress today, or he was afraid vote for or against a troop withdrawal on the record.

MANDEL NGAN/AFP

The most telling thing about the Senate vote this afternoon on the $124 billion supplemental war spending bill, which happens to require American troops to begin withdrawing from Iraq in October, is who abstained from voting: John McCain, Lindsey Graham, and Tim Johnson.

“The Maverick” McCain was either too busy campaigning for president to return and vote on the most important and contentious issue facing Congress today, or he was afraid vote for or against a troop withdrawal on the record.

Likewise with Republican war critic Lindsey Graham. Sure, he’s on everyone’s A-list for Veep. But he’s also one of the smartest guys in the Senate, which is why I would have expected him to backup his rhetoric with a vote.

How disappointing.

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