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Cambodia faces its history

ELIZABETH GLASSANOS/FP Original Cambodia is finally taking a baby step to address its ugly history. A new book by Khamboly Dy, an expert on Cambodia’s genocide, came out on Wednesday. Dy’s A History of Democratic Kampuchea is significant because it’s the first history book written by a Cambodian on the period from 1975 to 1979, ...

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ELIZABETH GLASSANOS/FP Original

Cambodia is finally taking a baby step to address its ugly history. A new book by Khamboly Dy, an expert on Cambodia's genocide, came out on Wednesday. Dy's A History of Democratic Kampuchea is significant because it's the first history book written by a Cambodian on the period from 1975 to 1979, when the Khmer Rouge terrorized the population and caused the deaths of some 1.7 million people. However, it was only approved for use a "reference text" in schools, so Cambodia's government—which is led by people with Khmer Rouge pasts—isn't exactly embracing truth and reconciliation with open arms. But it's a start.

You can download a PDF of the book here from the Documentation Center of Cambodia's website. Eighty-four pages are in English, with the other 125 pages in Khmer.

ELIZABETH GLASSANOS/FP Original

Cambodia is finally taking a baby step to address its ugly history. A new book by Khamboly Dy, an expert on Cambodia’s genocide, came out on Wednesday. Dy’s A History of Democratic Kampuchea is significant because it’s the first history book written by a Cambodian on the period from 1975 to 1979, when the Khmer Rouge terrorized the population and caused the deaths of some 1.7 million people. However, it was only approved for use a “reference text” in schools, so Cambodia’s government—which is led by people with Khmer Rouge pasts—isn’t exactly embracing truth and reconciliation with open arms. But it’s a start.

You can download a PDF of the book here from the Documentation Center of Cambodia’s website. Eighty-four pages are in English, with the other 125 pages in Khmer.

It begins eloquently:

Many Cambodians have tried to put their memories of the regime behind them and move on. But we cannot progress—much less reconcile with ourselves and others—until we have confronted the past and understand both what happened and why it happened. Only with this understanding can we truly begin to heal.

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