Morning Brief, Friday, April 27

Middle East Win McNamee/Getty Images In a new book, former CIA director George Tenet accuses the Bush administration of making him a scapegoat for Iraq. The U.S. Senate passed a supplemental spending bill that funds U.S. troops to the tune of $124 billion but mandates their withdrawal from Iraq beginning Oct. 1. The Iraqi government ...

602264_070427_tenet_05.jpg
602264_070427_tenet_05.jpg

Middle East

Win McNamee/Getty Images

In a new book, former CIA director George Tenet accuses the Bush administration of making him a scapegoat for Iraq.

Middle East

Win McNamee/Getty Images

In a new book, former CIA director George Tenet accuses the Bush administration of making him a scapegoat for Iraq.

The U.S. Senate passed a supplemental spending bill that funds U.S. troops to the tune of $124 billion but mandates their withdrawal from Iraq beginning Oct. 1. The Iraqi government called the decision “negative,” President Bush has promised a veto, slamming the legislation as “defeatist,” and commanding Gen. David Petraeus said a withdrawal in the fall would lead to more “sectarian violence.”

Are Iraqi insurgents practicing to kill Britain’s Prince Harry?

Europe

Russian composer and cellist Mstistlav Rastropovich has died. He was 80 years old.

François Bayrou, “bronze medalist” in the French elections, accused Nicolas Sarkozy of snuffing out the former’s debate with Ségolène Royal. No matter who wins, France’s first spouse will be an unusual one. 

The yen is at an all-time low against the euro. 

Asia

Chinese officials admit that a Chinese-made protein additive does contain melamine, a chemical banned in food products, but deny that this was behind the recent deaths of U.S. pets. In fact, there may be another supplier. But throw in China’s deportation of five U.S. citizens, and it’s been a bad week for the Middle Kingdom. Even the route of the Olympic torch has become a vehicle for another China-Taiwan spat.

The Taliban has taken over a district in southeastern Afghanistan. 

Will Bush and Abe become best friends forever

Elsewhere

Rebels shot down a Russian military helicopter in Chechnya. Guess the Chechen war’s not over after all.

Somalia may be Ethiopia’s Iraq

Brazil’s President Lula da Silva launched a regional diplomatic initiative clearly aimed at shoring up Brazil as a counterweight to Venezuela’s Hugo Chávez.

The World Bank’s anticorruption team blamed Bank President Paul Wolfowitz for damaging their work. 

Yesterday on Passport:

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