So, George W. Bush walks into a bar …

It seems North Koreans love telling George W. Bush jokes. Or at least North Korean generals imagine that a little ribbing at the U.S. president's expense makes for a good ice-breaker with their South Korean counterparts. At a recent sit-down between North and South Korean military officials, one lieutenant general from north of the DMZ ...

It seems North Koreans love telling George W. Bush jokes. Or at least North Korean generals imagine that a little ribbing at the U.S. president's expense makes for a good ice-breaker with their South Korean counterparts. At a recent sit-down between North and South Korean military officials, one lieutenant general from north of the DMZ opened up the proceedings with the following:

It seems North Koreans love telling George W. Bush jokes. Or at least North Korean generals imagine that a little ribbing at the U.S. president's expense makes for a good ice-breaker with their South Korean counterparts. At a recent sit-down between North and South Korean military officials, one lieutenant general from north of the DMZ opened up the proceedings with the following:

I recently read a piece of political humour on the Internet called 'saving the president'," Lieutenant-General Kim Yong-chol was quoted as saying in pool reports from the talks.

He then retold the old yarn about Bush who goes out jogging one morning and, preoccupied with international affairs, fails to notice that a car is heading straight at him.

A group of schoolchildren pull the president away just in time, saving his life, and a grateful Bush offers them anything they want in the world as a reward.

"We want a place reserved for us at Arlington Memorial Cemetery," say the children.

"Why is that?" he asks.

"Because our parents will kill us if they find out what we've done."

Wow. With that kind of humor, it's hard to believe Kim Jong Il's haircut has escaped domestic ridicule for so long.

Carolyn O'Hara is a senior editor at Foreign Policy.

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