Competitive eating has a new top dog

The top dog is now the underdog, as King Kobayashi was toppled from his throne. At an eating competition in an Arizona mall over the weekend, Joey Chestnut of San Jose, California, ate 59 1/2 hot dogs in 12 minutes, besting the previous world record of 53 3/4 wieners set in 2004 by longtime champ ...

601509_070604_chestnut_05.jpg
601509_070604_chestnut_05.jpg

The top dog is now the underdog, as King Kobayashi was toppled from his throne. At an eating competition in an Arizona mall over the weekend, Joey Chestnut of San Jose, California, ate 59 1/2 hot dogs in 12 minutes, besting the previous world record of 53 3/4 wieners set in 2004 by longtime champ Takeru Kobayashi of Japan.

Chestnut has been an up-and-comer on the competitive eating circuit for a few years now. Last year, FP talked to George Shea, head of the International Federation of Competitive Eating, who predicted that Chestnut would eventually become champion. But the young Californian's real test will come next month, when we find out if he can steal the coveted Mustard Yellow Belt from his Japanese rival at Nathan’s Famous Fourth of July International Hot Dog-Eating Contest on Coney Island in New York. Our mouths salivate with anticipation.

The top dog is now the underdog, as King Kobayashi was toppled from his throne. At an eating competition in an Arizona mall over the weekend, Joey Chestnut of San Jose, California, ate 59 1/2 hot dogs in 12 minutes, besting the previous world record of 53 3/4 wieners set in 2004 by longtime champ Takeru Kobayashi of Japan.

Chestnut has been an up-and-comer on the competitive eating circuit for a few years now. Last year, FP talked to George Shea, head of the International Federation of Competitive Eating, who predicted that Chestnut would eventually become champion. But the young Californian’s real test will come next month, when we find out if he can steal the coveted Mustard Yellow Belt from his Japanese rival at Nathan’s Famous Fourth of July International Hot Dog-Eating Contest on Coney Island in New York. Our mouths salivate with anticipation.

Christine Y. Chen is a senior editor at Foreign Policy.

More from Foreign Policy

A Panzerhaubitze 2000 tank howitzer fires during a mission in Ukraine’s Donetsk region.
A Panzerhaubitze 2000 tank howitzer fires during a mission in Ukraine’s Donetsk region.

Lessons for the Next War

Twelve experts weigh in on how to prevent, deter, and—if necessary—fight the next conflict.

An illustration showing a torn Russian flag and Russian President Vladimir Putin.
An illustration showing a torn Russian flag and Russian President Vladimir Putin.

It’s High Time to Prepare for Russia’s Collapse

Not planning for the possibility of disintegration betrays a dangerous lack of imagination.

An unexploded tail section of a cluster bomb is seen in Ukraine.
An unexploded tail section of a cluster bomb is seen in Ukraine.

Turkey Is Sending Cold War-Era Cluster Bombs to Ukraine

The artillery-fired cluster munitions could be lethal to Russian troops—and Ukrainian civilians.

A joint session of Congress meets to count the Electoral College vote from the 2008 presidential election the House Chamber in the U.S. Capitol  January 8, 2009 in Washington.
A joint session of Congress meets to count the Electoral College vote from the 2008 presidential election the House Chamber in the U.S. Capitol January 8, 2009 in Washington.

Congrats, You’re a Member of Congress. Now Listen Up.

Some brief foreign-policy advice for the newest members of the U.S. legislature.