Sound and fury on the World Bank board

After all that sturm und drang from countries like Brazil and South Africa about the nominating process for the president of the World Bank, guess what happened? Nothing. On Friday, June 15, the deadline passed for board members to nominate alternatives to Robert Zoellick, the U.S. candidate. Nary a peep was heard. Advocates of a ...

601084_070508_zoellick_05.jpg
601084_070508_zoellick_05.jpg

After all that sturm und drang from countries like Brazil and South Africa about the nominating process for the president of the World Bank, guess what happened?

Nothing.

On Friday, June 15, the deadline passed for board members to nominate alternatives to Robert Zoellick, the U.S. candidate. Nary a peep was heard. Advocates of a more open process tell Reuters they're pleased with the choice of Zoellick, as am I. But that's hardly the point. The Bank ought to practice what it preaches by running a more open selection process. (Chances are, the extremely qualified Zoellick would have emerged near the top of the pile in any case.)

After all that sturm und drang from countries like Brazil and South Africa about the nominating process for the president of the World Bank, guess what happened?

Nothing.

On Friday, June 15, the deadline passed for board members to nominate alternatives to Robert Zoellick, the U.S. candidate. Nary a peep was heard. Advocates of a more open process tell Reuters they’re pleased with the choice of Zoellick, as am I. But that’s hardly the point. The Bank ought to practice what it preaches by running a more open selection process. (Chances are, the extremely qualified Zoellick would have emerged near the top of the pile in any case.)

The world’s quickness to fold on this issue will lend credibility to what the Bush administration and its acolytes have been saying all along: For all the talk of a world allied against American unilateralism, the United States still gets its way far more often than not.

More from Foreign Policy

A Panzerhaubitze 2000 tank howitzer fires during a mission in Ukraine’s Donetsk region.
A Panzerhaubitze 2000 tank howitzer fires during a mission in Ukraine’s Donetsk region.

Lessons for the Next War

Twelve experts weigh in on how to prevent, deter, and—if necessary—fight the next conflict.

An illustration showing a torn Russian flag and Russian President Vladimir Putin.
An illustration showing a torn Russian flag and Russian President Vladimir Putin.

It’s High Time to Prepare for Russia’s Collapse

Not planning for the possibility of disintegration betrays a dangerous lack of imagination.

An unexploded tail section of a cluster bomb is seen in Ukraine.
An unexploded tail section of a cluster bomb is seen in Ukraine.

Turkey Is Sending Cold War-Era Cluster Bombs to Ukraine

The artillery-fired cluster munitions could be lethal to Russian troops—and Ukrainian civilians.

A joint session of Congress meets to count the Electoral College vote from the 2008 presidential election the House Chamber in the U.S. Capitol  January 8, 2009 in Washington.
A joint session of Congress meets to count the Electoral College vote from the 2008 presidential election the House Chamber in the U.S. Capitol January 8, 2009 in Washington.

Congrats, You’re a Member of Congress. Now Listen Up.

Some brief foreign-policy advice for the newest members of the U.S. legislature.