Viral marketing gets extremely literal

A new computer virus was identified last week that spreads via USB flash drives and other removable media on Windows PCs. This method of propagation is about as old as computers themselves. So what’s the big deal? It’s the content of the program that makes this particular virus so special. The worm doesn’t infect a ...

601010_280px-Aids_virus_05.jpg
601010_280px-Aids_virus_05.jpg

A new computer virus was identified last week that spreads via USB flash drives and other removable media on Windows PCs. This method of propagation is about as old as computers themselves. So what's the big deal? It's the content of the program that makes this particular virus so special.

The worm doesn't infect a computer with maladjusted software or erase important system files. Instead, it spreads educational information about HIV/AIDS. Security experts have been quick to point out that the worm, called "liarVB-a," does no explicit harm to the user's computer, but it's still a potential security threat. Graham Cluley, a senior senior technology consultant at the security firm Sophos, explains:

Even though the hackers responsible for this worm aren't set on filling their pockets with cash, and may feel that they are spreading an important message, they are still breaking the law. In the future we might see more graffiti-style malware being written on behalf of political, religious and other groups looking for a soapbox to broadcast their opinions."

A new computer virus was identified last week that spreads via USB flash drives and other removable media on Windows PCs. This method of propagation is about as old as computers themselves. So what’s the big deal? It’s the content of the program that makes this particular virus so special.

The worm doesn’t infect a computer with maladjusted software or erase important system files. Instead, it spreads educational information about HIV/AIDS. Security experts have been quick to point out that the worm, called “liarVB-a,” does no explicit harm to the user’s computer, but it’s still a potential security threat. Graham Cluley, a senior senior technology consultant at the security firm Sophos, explains:

Even though the hackers responsible for this worm aren’t set on filling their pockets with cash, and may feel that they are spreading an important message, they are still breaking the law. In the future we might see more graffiti-style malware being written on behalf of political, religious and other groups looking for a soapbox to broadcast their opinions.”

Personally, I’m very curious to see the contents of this worm. Is the information contained in the worm about HIV/AIDS accurate? What was its original source? Wikipedia? So far, copies of the program are hard to find. If your computer becomes infected with the worm, let us know

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