Need a fake Benjamin? Try one of Putin’s guys.

Photo Illustration: Elizabeth Glassanos for FPPhotos: Getty Images Russian President Vladimir Putin is headed to the Bush family retreat in Maine this weekend, but his security detail has already caused a minor diplomatic snafu. The Russia equivalent of the secret service arrived in the United States a few days early to get a lay of ...

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600834_hundredPutin2.jpg
386361 03: UNDATED FILE PHOTO: The 1996 U.S. One Hundred Dollar currency series incorporates new features designed to improve the security of the currency. The new design was released in 1996 by the Bureau of Engraving and Printing. (Photo by Newsmakers)

Photo Illustration: Elizabeth Glassanos for FP
Photos: Getty Images

Russian President Vladimir Putin is headed to the Bush family retreat in Maine this weekend, but his security detail has already caused a minor diplomatic snafu. The Russia equivalent of the secret service arrived in the United States a few days early to get a lay of the land, and they're staying in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, just down the pike from Kennebunkport. Last night, a few of them walked into a Portsmouth liquor store and tried to buy a few bottles of whiskey with a phony $100 bill. After the liquor store owner called the cops, diplomatic immunity was reportedly invoked.

First, it's too bad the guys didn't just go down the road to the restaurant offering "Hootin Putin" cocktails in honor of the visit. Perhaps those guys wouldn't have detected the bum cash they're trying to pass around. And second, frankly I'm suspicious that these guys weren't set up. I mean, it seems so implausible: two bottles of whiskey for five Russians? Tell me that doesn't have the makings of a frame job.



Photo Illustration: Elizabeth Glassanos for FP
Photos: Getty Images

Russian President Vladimir Putin is headed to the Bush family retreat in Maine this weekend, but his security detail has already caused a minor diplomatic snafu. The Russia equivalent of the secret service arrived in the United States a few days early to get a lay of the land, and they’re staying in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, just down the pike from Kennebunkport. Last night, a few of them walked into a Portsmouth liquor store and tried to buy a few bottles of whiskey with a phony $100 bill. After the liquor store owner called the cops, diplomatic immunity was reportedly invoked.

First, it’s too bad the guys didn’t just go down the road to the restaurant offering “Hootin Putin” cocktails in honor of the visit. Perhaps those guys wouldn’t have detected the bum cash they’re trying to pass around. And second, frankly I’m suspicious that these guys weren’t set up. I mean, it seems so implausible: two bottles of whiskey for five Russians? Tell me that doesn’t have the makings of a frame job.

Carolyn O'Hara is a senior editor at Foreign Policy.
Tag: Russia

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