At last, Afghanistan attacks its drug problem

FAROOQ NAEEM/AFP/Getty Images The campaign to impose Western values on the Middle East is finally gaining some traction in war-ravaged Afghanistan: The Council of Ministers in Kabul has just taken the first step toward banning smoking in public places. The Afghans may taking the cue from the British government, which outlawed smoking in public places ...

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600801_070703_afghanistan_05.jpg

FAROOQ NAEEM/AFP/Getty Images

The campaign to impose Western values on the Middle East is finally gaining some traction in war-ravaged Afghanistan: The Council of Ministers in Kabul has just taken the first step toward banning smoking in public places.

The Afghans may taking the cue from the British government, which outlawed smoking in public places starting this week, or New York, where citizens had to stub out their cigarettes four years ago. Regardless, we can all breathe a little easier knowing that the Afghan government will be putting to good use the €200 million that the European Commission just pledged to beef up Afghanistan's justice system.

FAROOQ NAEEM/AFP/Getty Images

The campaign to impose Western values on the Middle East is finally gaining some traction in war-ravaged Afghanistan: The Council of Ministers in Kabul has just taken the first step toward banning smoking in public places.

The Afghans may taking the cue from the British government, which outlawed smoking in public places starting this week, or New York, where citizens had to stub out their cigarettes four years ago. Regardless, we can all breathe a little easier knowing that the Afghan government will be putting to good use the €200 million that the European Commission just pledged to beef up Afghanistan’s justice system.

Never mind that 92% of the world’s heroin comes from Afghan poppies, or the fact that Afghan kids are hooked on opium; I’m thankful that the Afghan government is finally taking on the gravest threats to its people.

Sam duPont is a Master's candidate at Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School and focused his capstone research on transitional democracies and elections in fragile states.

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