Earn yourself a high-profile acknowledgement!!!

The hard-working staff here at danieldrezner.com is calling on its readers for help. Your humble blogger has a forthcoming article in Perspectives on Politics that, in draft form, used the following editorial cartoon to explain a particular theory of public opinion formation: image001.jpg In order to publish the cartoon in the article, I need to ...

By , a professor of international politics at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University.
590058_856195690_image0012.jpg
590058_856195690_image0012.jpg

The hard-working staff here at danieldrezner.com is calling on its readers for help. Your humble blogger has a forthcoming article in
Perspectives on Politics
that, in draft form, used the following editorial cartoon to explain a particular theory of public opinion formation: In order to publish the cartoon in the article, I need to locate a cleaner version of this caroon, plus copyright permission from the syndicate that distributes it. The thing is, I have no idea who drew this editorial cartoon, or which syndicate distributed it. As the cartoon probably suggests, I clipped it out of a newspaper more than a decade ago because I thought it was funny. I had no idea I'd be using it for a scholarly article. So, whoever can identify the artist and syndicate that distributed this sucker will get added to the acknowledgments in the paper itself. {Wow, a real acknowledgment!! Are employees eligible?--ed. Eligibility restricted to individuals not directly related to the blogger.] Go to it!! UPDATE: Thanks to the many readers who responded with the correct answer -- the Akron Beacon Journal's Chip Bok. Alas, only the first responder gets the acknowledgement.

The hard-working staff here at danieldrezner.com is calling on its readers for help. Your humble blogger has a forthcoming article in
Perspectives on Politics
that, in draft form, used the following editorial cartoon to explain a particular theory of public opinion formation: image001.jpg

image001.jpg
In order to publish the cartoon in the article, I need to locate a cleaner version of this caroon, plus copyright permission from the syndicate that distributes it. The thing is, I have no idea who drew this editorial cartoon, or which syndicate distributed it. As the cartoon probably suggests, I clipped it out of a newspaper more than a decade ago because I thought it was funny. I had no idea I’d be using it for a scholarly article. So, whoever can identify the artist and syndicate that distributed this sucker will get added to the acknowledgments in the paper itself. {Wow, a real acknowledgment!! Are employees eligible?–ed. Eligibility restricted to individuals not directly related to the blogger.] Go to it!! UPDATE: Thanks to the many readers who responded with the correct answer — the Akron Beacon Journal‘s Chip Bok. Alas, only the first responder gets the acknowledgement.

Daniel W. Drezner is a professor of international politics at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University, where he is the co-director of the Russia and Eurasia Program. Twitter: @dandrezner

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