Last chance to vote for seven new Wonders of the World

Sean Gallup/Getty Images News The original list of the seven wonders of the world was compiled in 140 B.C. by a small group of scholars at the Museum of Alexandria in Egypt. Now, a new list of the world’s seven wonders is being put to a vote by the world’s people. So far, 90 million ...

600742_070706_pyramids_05.jpg
600742_070706_pyramids_05.jpg
GIZA, EGYPT - NOVEMBER 13: The three large pyramids of Menkaure (L), Khafre (C) and Khufu loom over the horizon November 13, 2004 at Giza, just outside Cairo, Egypt. The three large pyramids at Giza, built by King Khufu over a 30 year period around 2,550 B.C., are among Egypt's biggest tourist attractions. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

Sean Gallup/Getty Images News

The original list of the seven wonders of the world was compiled in 140 B.C. by a small group of scholars at the Museum of Alexandria in Egypt. Now, a new list of the world's seven wonders is being put to a vote by the world's people. So far, 90 million people across the globe have voted. If you haven't yet cast your ballot, you have until 7 p.m. EST to vote for your top seven of the 21 candidates. (Warning: The New Seven Wonders site seems to be having trouble due to the last-minute rush of voting.)

In a world of American Idol-type TV shows, the contest raises the age-old question of whether artistic and historical value can be put to a popular vote. And sure enough, the campaign for an updated list of world wonders, initiated by a Swiss filmmaker, has generated plenty of controversy.

Sean Gallup/Getty Images News

The original list of the seven wonders of the world was compiled in 140 B.C. by a small group of scholars at the Museum of Alexandria in Egypt. Now, a new list of the world’s seven wonders is being put to a vote by the world’s people. So far, 90 million people across the globe have voted. If you haven’t yet cast your ballot, you have until 7 p.m. EST to vote for your top seven of the 21 candidates. (Warning: The New Seven Wonders site seems to be having trouble due to the last-minute rush of voting.)

In a world of American Idoltype TV shows, the contest raises the age-old question of whether artistic and historical value can be put to a popular vote. And sure enough, the campaign for an updated list of world wonders, initiated by a Swiss filmmaker, has generated plenty of controversy.

Egypt said that the Pyramids of Giza shouldn’t have to compete to be on the list since they were on the original list of world wonders. As a result, the pyramids were given an honorary place on the list, so there will actually be eight wonders when the competition ends. Meanwhile, the Vatican alleges an anti-Christian bias because structures such as the Sistine Chapel weren’t selected as candidates. And UNESCO, which is not connected to the contest, said the selection method is unscientific, and voting will be based on nationalism.

The results will be announced Saturday, so we’ll find out if UNESCO is right.

Preeti Aroon was copy chief at Foreign Policy from 2009 to 2016 and was an FP assistant editor from 2007 to 2009. Twitter: @pjaroonFP

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