Harry Houdini found in Uganda

Those hoping for a miracle need only stop by their local magic shop and look somewhere between the magic coins and the trick-card deck. The Ghanaian “prophet” Obiri Yeboah, head of a Pentecostal church in Uganda, was caught red-handed by Ugandan police with a magic device he had used to dupe his congregation into believing ...

600649_070711_electrictouch_05.jpg
600649_070711_electrictouch_05.jpg

Those hoping for a miracle need only stop by their local magic shop and look somewhere between the magic coins and the trick-card deck.

The Ghanaian "prophet" Obiri Yeboah, head of a Pentecostal church in Uganda, was caught red-handed by Ugandan police with a magic device he had used to dupe his congregation into believing they were experiencing miracles.

It turns out that "The Electric Touch" is not a miracle at all, but is actually intended for budding magicians, who can use it to administer small electric shocks to their unsuspecting volunteers. (Check out a video of the device in action here.)

Those hoping for a miracle need only stop by their local magic shop and look somewhere between the magic coins and the trick-card deck.

The Ghanaian “prophet” Obiri Yeboah, head of a Pentecostal church in Uganda, was caught red-handed by Ugandan police with a magic device he had used to dupe his congregation into believing they were experiencing miracles.

It turns out that “The Electric Touch” is not a miracle at all, but is actually intended for budding magicians, who can use it to administer small electric shocks to their unsuspecting volunteers. (Check out a video of the device in action here.)

In a country where the average income is $280, Yeboah is said to have collected large sums of money from devout followers who had faith in these miracle performances. His church is part of the growing “miracle church” phenomenon in the turbulent east African country, where some preachers dangerously claim that they can cure HIV/AIDS through special healing powers. 

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