Morning Brief, Monday, July 16

Asia Digital Globe/Getty Images North Korea has indeed shut down its nuclear reactor, according to U.N. inspectors. Can U.S. cash win hearts and minds in the rural wilds of Pakistan, where a 10-month truce between Taliban-allied tribes and the government has fallen apart? Bangladesh’s former prime minister, Hasina Wazed, was arrested on corruption charges. Middle ...

600582_070716_yongbyon_05.jpg
600582_070716_yongbyon_05.jpg

Asia

Digital Globe/Getty Images

North Korea has indeed shut down its nuclear reactor, according to U.N. inspectors.

Asia

Digital Globe/Getty Images

North Korea has indeed shut down its nuclear reactor, according to U.N. inspectors.

Can U.S. cash win hearts and minds in the rural wilds of Pakistan, where a 10-month truce between Taliban-allied tribes and the government has fallen apart?

Bangladesh’s former prime minister, Hasina Wazed, was arrested on corruption charges.

Middle East

Working with former Sunni insurgents is a tricky business for the U.S. military. 

At least 80 people died in Kirkuk, Iraq, after bombs struck a crowded market and a busy street.

Debt for nurses: Details are emerging about a possible deal between Eastern European countries and Libya over the fate of five Bulgarian nurses accused of deliberately infecting Libyan children with HIV. 

Europe

Russia will no longer honor the Conventional Forces in Europe Treaty, a key Cold War arms control pact.  

The AK-47 turns 60

Two former suspects in the failed London and Glasgow bombings were released without charges.

Elsewhere

A minor explosion struck the British Embassy in Chile. 

Andrew Revkin of the New York Times looks at the hype surrounding solar energy

A television station opposed to Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez resumed broadcasting Monday, but only on cable and satellite. 

Today’s Agenda

  • French President Nicolas Sarkozy meets with German Chancellor Angela Merkel in Toulouse to discuss Europe’s aerospace program, EADS.
  • U.S. President George W. Bush hosts Polish President Lech Kaczynski in Washington.
  • The U.N.-backed court in Sierra Leone sentences three militia leaders who were recently convicted of war crimes.

More from Foreign Policy

A Panzerhaubitze 2000 tank howitzer fires during a mission in Ukraine’s Donetsk region.
A Panzerhaubitze 2000 tank howitzer fires during a mission in Ukraine’s Donetsk region.

Lessons for the Next War

Twelve experts weigh in on how to prevent, deter, and—if necessary—fight the next conflict.

An illustration showing a torn Russian flag and Russian President Vladimir Putin.
An illustration showing a torn Russian flag and Russian President Vladimir Putin.

It’s High Time to Prepare for Russia’s Collapse

Not planning for the possibility of disintegration betrays a dangerous lack of imagination.

An unexploded tail section of a cluster bomb is seen in Ukraine.
An unexploded tail section of a cluster bomb is seen in Ukraine.

Turkey Is Sending Cold War-Era Cluster Bombs to Ukraine

The artillery-fired cluster munitions could be lethal to Russian troops—and Ukrainian civilians.

A joint session of Congress meets to count the Electoral College vote from the 2008 presidential election the House Chamber in the U.S. Capitol  January 8, 2009 in Washington.
A joint session of Congress meets to count the Electoral College vote from the 2008 presidential election the House Chamber in the U.S. Capitol January 8, 2009 in Washington.

Congrats, You’re a Member of Congress. Now Listen Up.

Some brief foreign-policy advice for the newest members of the U.S. legislature.