Morning Brief, Tuesday, July 17

Middle East Getty Images U.S. President George W. Bush promised more aid to the Palestinian government of Mahmoud Abbas and called for Arab states to make peace with Israel.  Israeli cabinet ministers approved 256 Palestinian prisoners for release on Friday, in the hopes of bolstering Abbas. What would happen in Iraq were the United States ...

600535_070717_bush_05.jpg
600535_070717_bush_05.jpg

Middle East

Getty Images

U.S. President George W. Bush promised more aid to the Palestinian government of Mahmoud Abbas and called for Arab states to make peace with Israel. 

Middle East

Getty Images

U.S. President George W. Bush promised more aid to the Palestinian government of Mahmoud Abbas and called for Arab states to make peace with Israel. 

Israeli cabinet ministers approved 256 Palestinian prisoners for release on Friday, in the hopes of bolstering Abbas.

What would happen in Iraq were the United States to leave? Thomas Ricks and Karen DeYoung explore likely scenarios for the Washington Post.

Europe

Britain is kicking four Russian diplomats out of the country, and Foreign Secretary David Milliband is reviewing bilateral relations “on a range of issues” in retaliation for Russia’s noncooperation in the Litvinenko case. Russia threatens “serious consequences” for the British move.

A 46-year-old ex-cop in Siberia claims to be Jesus, and at least 5,000 Russians believe him.

Being an independent candidate for Turkey’s parliament can be a dangerous business

Asia

The earthquake in Japan—which killed at least nine people yesterday—also knocked over around 100 barrels of nuclear waste at a nuclear power plant.

India’s glaciers are in pell-mell retreat

Pakistan’s government is looking to reinvigorate a shaky peace arrangement in the country’s tribal areas. 

Elsewhere 

Migrant workers who go to the United States sometimes bring HIV/AIDS with them back to Mexico.

Somalia’s fragile transitional federal government is failing its first key test

As expected, a draft resolution on sending U.N. and African Union peacekeepers to Darfur is hitting some snags in the Security Council. 

Today’s Agenda

  • India’s national security advisor, M.K. Narayanan, is in Washington for discussions with senior Bush administration officials on moving the stalled the U.S.-India nuclear deal forward.
  • Tony Blair arrives in Jerusalem for his “orientation” as Middle East envoy.
  • Bashar al-Assad gets sworn in today for a second seven-year term as Syria’s president.
  • U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki Moon meets with President Bush at the White House.
  • Norman Borlaug, father of the “green revolution” in agriculture, wins the Congressional Gold Medal.
  • The World Series of Poker holds its final round in Las Vegas. The prize: $8.25 million.

Yesterday on Passport

More from Foreign Policy

An illustration shows George Kennan, the father of Cold War containment strategy.
An illustration shows George Kennan, the father of Cold War containment strategy.

Is Cold War Inevitable?

A new biography of George Kennan, the father of containment, raises questions about whether the old Cold War—and the emerging one with China—could have been avoided.

U.S. President Joe Biden speaks on the DISCLOSE Act.
U.S. President Joe Biden speaks on the DISCLOSE Act.

So You Want to Buy an Ambassadorship

The United States is the only Western government that routinely rewards mega-donors with top diplomatic posts.

Chinese President Xi jinping  toasts the guests during a banquet marking the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China on September 30, 2019 in Beijing, China.
Chinese President Xi jinping toasts the guests during a banquet marking the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China on September 30, 2019 in Beijing, China.

Can China Pull Off Its Charm Offensive?

Why Beijing’s foreign-policy reset will—or won’t—work out.

Turkish Defense Minister Hulusi Akar chairs a meeting in Ankara, Turkey on Nov. 21, 2022.
Turkish Defense Minister Hulusi Akar chairs a meeting in Ankara, Turkey on Nov. 21, 2022.

Turkey’s Problem Isn’t Sweden. It’s the United States.

Erdogan has focused on Stockholm’s stance toward Kurdish exile groups, but Ankara’s real demand is the end of U.S. support for Kurds in Syria.