It’s rainin’ yen!

Al Freni/Getty Images Ever wondered what it would be like if it rained cash? Well, many residents of Tokyo don’t have to imagine. The BBC reports that mysterious stashes of money are popping up around Japan. It all started in the men’s rooms of local council buildings all across Japan, where lucky bathroom-goers found over ...

Al Freni/Getty Images

Ever wondered what it would be like if it rained cash? Well, many residents of Tokyo don't have to imagine.

The BBC reports that mysterious stashes of money are popping up around Japan. It all started in the men's rooms of local council buildings all across Japan, where lucky bathroom-goers found over 400 blank envelopes, each containing the same amount and accompanied by a note stating that the money should be used for "ascetic training." Then last week, "bills started falling out of the sky"—18 residents of a Tokyo building found envelopes stuffed with cash in their mailboxes, totaling ¥1.81 million yen ($15,210), and with no instructions as to where the money should go.

Al Freni/Getty Images

Ever wondered what it would be like if it rained cash? Well, many residents of Tokyo don’t have to imagine.

The BBC reports that mysterious stashes of money are popping up around Japan. It all started in the men’s rooms of local council buildings all across Japan, where lucky bathroom-goers found over 400 blank envelopes, each containing the same amount and accompanied by a note stating that the money should be used for “ascetic training.” Then last week, “bills started falling out of the sky”—18 residents of a Tokyo building found envelopes stuffed with cash in their mailboxes, totaling ¥1.81 million yen ($15,210), and with no instructions as to where the money should go.

So where is all this cash coming from? Residents and officials are baffled. Theories range from religious motives to the work of a rich businessman who has no idea what to do with his money. But one thing’s for sure: The Japanese are uneasy about the free money. One resident pleaded for his privacy, “People are very, very worried…. Put yourself in our shoes. We are very anxious.” According to the BBC, all the money has been given to the police.

Prerna Mankad is a researcher at Foreign Policy.

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