Morning Brief, Tuesday, August 7

Middle East KARIM JAAFAR/AFP/Getty Images Five more ministers—this batch aligned with former PM Iyad Allawi—have quit the Iraqi cabinet, though they will remain ministers. Also, the United States and Iran held their first joint security meeting in Baghdad. But in Basra, Shiite militias are escalating their battle for dominance as British forces retreat. Both sides ...

600120_070807_allawi_05.jpg
600120_070807_allawi_05.jpg

Middle East

KARIM JAAFAR/AFP/Getty Images

Five more ministers—this batch aligned with former PM Iyad Allawi—have quit the Iraqi cabinet, though they will remain ministers. Also, the United States and Iran held their first joint security meeting in Baghdad. But in Basra, Shiite militias are escalating their battle for dominance as British forces retreat.

Middle East

KARIM JAAFAR/AFP/Getty Images

Five more ministers—this batch aligned with former PM Iyad Allawi—have quit the Iraqi cabinet, though they will remain ministers. Also, the United States and Iran held their first joint security meeting in Baghdad. But in Basra, Shiite militias are escalating their battle for dominance as British forces retreat.

Both sides described Monday’s talks between Israeli PM Ehud Olmert and Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas as positive. 

Israeli troops ousted dozens of illegal squatters from two houses in Hebron, the West Bank.

Europe

Georgia accuses Russia of violating its airspace. 

Europe is blocking reform of the International Monetary Fund. 

German rail workers are threatening to go on strike Wednesday.

Asia

China banned imports of Indonesian fish after the latter criticized the safety of Chinese exports. 

For the fourth time, Indonesia won’t share bird flu samples with the WHO.  

Shocking: Pakistan’s ambassador says his country is doing a great job in fighting terrorism.

Elsewhere

Fallout from the subprime mortgage mess is even hitting silverware manufacturers now, but Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson thinks it’s all just “a reassessment of risk.” Daniel Gross writes, “If the containment policy of the Cold War worked as well as this subprime-mess containment policy, we’d all be speaking Russian and living on collective farms.”

Nigeria’s new president: a paragon of virtue

Three men accused of plotting to attack New York’s JFK airport will be extradited from Trinidad to the United States. 

Today’s Agenda

  • Talks are beginning in the demilitarized zone between North and South Korea on what North Korea needs to do to get 950,000 tons of heavy fuel oil.
  • Venezuela hosts the first International Congress of Indigenous Peoples.
  • The Open Market Committee of the U.S. Federal Reserve discusses interest rates. A rate cut is unlikely, despite the subprime crisis, because the Fed fears inflation.

Yesterday on Passport

More from Foreign Policy

A Panzerhaubitze 2000 tank howitzer fires during a mission in Ukraine’s Donetsk region.
A Panzerhaubitze 2000 tank howitzer fires during a mission in Ukraine’s Donetsk region.

Lessons for the Next War

Twelve experts weigh in on how to prevent, deter, and—if necessary—fight the next conflict.

An illustration showing a torn Russian flag and Russian President Vladimir Putin.
An illustration showing a torn Russian flag and Russian President Vladimir Putin.

It’s High Time to Prepare for Russia’s Collapse

Not planning for the possibility of disintegration betrays a dangerous lack of imagination.

An unexploded tail section of a cluster bomb is seen in Ukraine.
An unexploded tail section of a cluster bomb is seen in Ukraine.

Turkey Is Sending Cold War-Era Cluster Bombs to Ukraine

The artillery-fired cluster munitions could be lethal to Russian troops—and Ukrainian civilians.

A joint session of Congress meets to count the Electoral College vote from the 2008 presidential election the House Chamber in the U.S. Capitol  January 8, 2009 in Washington.
A joint session of Congress meets to count the Electoral College vote from the 2008 presidential election the House Chamber in the U.S. Capitol January 8, 2009 in Washington.

Congrats, You’re a Member of Congress. Now Listen Up.

Some brief foreign-policy advice for the newest members of the U.S. legislature.