Stop global warming – by buying more stuff

What if instead of airline miles, cash back or hotel stays, your credit card paid you back in carbon offsets? That’s exactly what GE’s new “Earth Rewards” card will do. One percent of your purchases go directly toward buying carbon offsets, which supposedly finance eco-friendly projects around the world designed to limit greenhouse gases and ...

600038_credit-cards_0_15.jpg
600038_credit-cards_0_15.jpg

What if instead of airline miles, cash back or hotel stays, your credit card paid you back in carbon offsets?

That's exactly what GE's new "Earth Rewards" card will do. One percent of your purchases go directly toward buying carbon offsets, which supposedly finance eco-friendly projects around the world designed to limit greenhouse gases and stop climate change.

What if instead of airline miles, cash back or hotel stays, your credit card paid you back in carbon offsets?

That’s exactly what GE’s new “Earth Rewards” card will do. One percent of your purchases go directly toward buying carbon offsets, which supposedly finance eco-friendly projects around the world designed to limit greenhouse gases and stop climate change.

It’s a nice idea, but part of the problem with climate change is that we will never be able to buy our way out of it. Encouraging consumption in order to offset just one percent of that consumption is a futile effort at mitigating environmental issues. Using the GE Earth Rewards card is probably better for the environment than redeeming rewards for carbon-emitting airline flights. Still, the whole concept remains a bit ironic.

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