U.S. company strikes gold in tracking Chinese citizens

Need any more proof that markets are value-neutral?  Take a look at the share price of China Public Security Technology (CPST), which jumped over 20 percent following Sunday’s article in the New York Times. In the article, the Times called out the Florida-based company for providing technology that will help the Chinese government monitor its ...

600007_080713_CPST_05.png
600007_080713_CPST_05.png

Need any more proof that markets are value-neutral? 

Take a look at the share price of China Public Security Technology (CPST), which jumped over 20 percent following Sunday's article in the New York Times. In the article, the Times called out the Florida-based company for providing technology that will help the Chinese government monitor its citizens even closer than before:

Starting this month in a port neighborhood and then spreading across Shenzhen, a city of 12.4 million people, residency cards fitted with powerful computer chips programmed by the same company will be issued to most citizens.

Need any more proof that markets are value-neutral? 

Take a look at the share price of China Public Security Technology (CPST), which jumped over 20 percent following Sunday’s article in the New York Times. In the article, the Times called out the Florida-based company for providing technology that will help the Chinese government monitor its citizens even closer than before:

Starting this month in a port neighborhood and then spreading across Shenzhen, a city of 12.4 million people, residency cards fitted with powerful computer chips programmed by the same company will be issued to most citizens.

Data on the chip will include not just the citizen’s name and address but also work history, educational background, religion, ethnicity, police record, medical insurance status and landlord’s phone number. Even personal reproductive history will be included, for enforcement of China’s controversial “one child” policy. Plans are being studied to add credit histories, subway travel payments and small purchases charged to the card.

It’s not something I’d want to be associated with, but investors who bought shares in CPST today are just behaving rationally. After all, electronic surveillance is a growth market—and nowhere more so than in China.

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