Morning Brief, Tuesday, September 4

Middle East: Bush Visits Iraq JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images Making a surprise visit to Iraq, U.S. President George W. Bush cited progress and hinted at possible future troop reductions. The Washington Post says the surge’s results are mixed, though. Former U.S. envoy to Iraq Paul Bremer tells the New York Times that the president signed off ...

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Middle East: Bush Visits Iraq

JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images

Making a surprise visit to Iraq, U.S. President George W. Bush cited progress and hinted at possible future troop reductions. The Washington Post says the surge's results are mixed, though.

Middle East: Bush Visits Iraq

JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images

Making a surprise visit to Iraq, U.S. President George W. Bush cited progress and hinted at possible future troop reductions. The Washington Post says the surge’s results are mixed, though.

Former U.S. envoy to Iraq Paul Bremer tells the New York Times that the president signed off on the decision to disband the Iraqi military back in 2003.

In a victory for pragmatic conservatives. Iranian clerics chose former President Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani to head the powerful Assembly of Experts.

Asia

Suicide bombings in Rawalpindi, Pakistan, killed at least 24 people. 

China denies hacking into the Pentagon’s computer network.

U.S. negotiator Chris Hill said that North Korea remains on the list of countries that support terrorism. 

Europe

Striking maintenance workers are paralyzing London’s commuters.

Danish police arrested eight al Qaeda suspects

Gunmen attacked security forces in Chechnya, killing one and wounding four others. 

Elsewhere 

The former head of the White House Office of Legal Counsel has a new book describing his fight against those with an expansive view of executive power.

Workers are overhauling the Panama Canal.

Hurricane Felix hits Nicaragua

Today’s Agenda

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