The Suicide Order

URIEL SINAI/Getty Images News Syria’s boast that its “air defenses” shot at Israeli war planes today reminded me of this fantastic rant from a pseudonymous Syrian blogger going by the name of Karfan, meaning “disgusted” in Arabic: Back when Karfan was forced to serve his country and waste two years of his already-useless life in ...

599555_070906_IAF_05.jpg
599555_070906_IAF_05.jpg

URIEL SINAI/Getty Images News

Syria's boast that its "air defenses" shot at Israeli war planes today reminded me of this fantastic rant from a pseudonymous Syrian blogger going by the name of Karfan, meaning "disgusted" in Arabic:

Back when Karfan was forced to serve his country and waste two years of his already-useless life in the army, he was assigned to a radar unit in Lebanon. That was because his degree was in electronic engineering and all, although he himself did not have the slightest idea what did he study during those years he spent at university. Regardless of that fact, service at a radar station was both the most useless and most dangerous service in the Syrian Army. They were not allowed to ever turn on those junk backward radars the Russians had bullied Syria into buying. If they operate them, the Israelis would detect their location, send missiles and blow the whole thing up. You cannot think of any more useless way to spend a year and a half of your life: you have to sit inside a dead piece of junk that is supposed to detect enemy's airlines, but you cannot turn it on because if you do, it would be blown away, with you in it of course. The biggest fear was that one asshole up in the upper command, might actually take the risk and order them to turn the radars on one of those days. Every one there knew what would happen then; they code named it: The Suicide Order.

URIEL SINAI/Getty Images News

Syria’s boast that its “air defenses” shot at Israeli war planes today reminded me of this fantastic rant from a pseudonymous Syrian blogger going by the name of Karfan, meaning “disgusted” in Arabic:

Back when Karfan was forced to serve his country and waste two years of his already-useless life in the army, he was assigned to a radar unit in Lebanon. That was because his degree was in electronic engineering and all, although he himself did not have the slightest idea what did he study during those years he spent at university. Regardless of that fact, service at a radar station was both the most useless and most dangerous service in the Syrian Army. They were not allowed to ever turn on those junk backward radars the Russians had bullied Syria into buying. If they operate them, the Israelis would detect their location, send missiles and blow the whole thing up. You cannot think of any more useless way to spend a year and a half of your life: you have to sit inside a dead piece of junk that is supposed to detect enemy’s airlines, but you cannot turn it on because if you do, it would be blown away, with you in it of course. The biggest fear was that one asshole up in the upper command, might actually take the risk and order them to turn the radars on one of those days. Every one there knew what would happen then; they code named it: The Suicide Order.

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