Morning Brief, Tuesday, September 18

Asia Pervez Musharraf’s lawyer informed the Supreme Court that the Pakistani leader would give up his army chief post if reelected as president. North Korea’s foreign ministry dismissed as “sheer misinformation” reports that the hermit kingdom was supplying Syria with nuclear materials. Yasuo Fukuda appears to have a lock on the leadership of Japan’s ruling ...

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599305_musharraf_pc_05.jpg

Asia

Pervez Musharraf's lawyer informed the Supreme Court that the Pakistani leader would give up his army chief post if reelected as president.

North Korea's foreign ministry dismissed as "sheer misinformation" reports that the hermit kingdom was supplying Syria with nuclear materials.

Asia

Pervez Musharraf’s lawyer informed the Supreme Court that the Pakistani leader would give up his army chief post if reelected as president.

North Korea’s foreign ministry dismissed as “sheer misinformation” reports that the hermit kingdom was supplying Syria with nuclear materials.

Yasuo Fukuda appears to have a lock on the leadership of Japan’s ruling Liberal Democratic Party, and therefore will likely succeed Shinzo Abe as prime minister.

China’s growth is good for Boeing.

Europe

France’s foreign minister sought to clarify his hawkish remarks on Iran, which had set off quite a stir in Paris, Tehran, and even Beijing and Moscow.

A top climate researcher says that Europe’s climate change targets likely won’t be met.

Shares of besieged British lender Northern Rock appear to have stabilized after the Bank of England promised to guarantee all deposits.

Middle East

Iraq’s government wants to ban Blackwater, the U.S. contractor that was involved in a bloody firefight Sunday while guarding a State Department convoy. It’s not clear Iraq has the authority to do so, however.

Iraq’s ruling United Iraqi Alliance called for the Sadr movement to return to the fold.  

Elsewhere

Sierra Leone swore in its new president

Eritrea denies U.S. charges that it is trying to overthrow the Somali government. 

Oil prices hit a new nominal high of $81.24 a barrel, a number that will likely come down as U.S. and European economic growth begins to slow.

Today’s Agenda

  • Chile celebrates its independence day.
  • The London Design Festival kicks off in … London.
  • The U.S. Federal Reserve’s Open Market Committee is likely to lower interest rates.
  • U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice heads to Israel.

Yesterday on Passport

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