Is Kim Jong Il a “rittle ronery?”

The summit between North Korea and South Korea took a strange turn today when news of an offer by the North’s Dear Leader Kim Jong Il to extend the conference by two days emerged. The offer—quickly rejected by South Korean President Roh Moo Hyun—came a day after Kim greeted Roh coldly, seemed disinterested in the ...

598893_071003_kjlsad_05.jpg
598893_071003_kjlsad_05.jpg

The summit between North Korea and South Korea took a strange turn today when news of an offer by the North's Dear Leader Kim Jong Il to extend the conference by two days emerged. The offer—quickly rejected by South Korean President Roh Moo Hyun—came a day after Kim greeted Roh coldly, seemed disinterested in the talks, and appeared ill. But on Wednesday, reports indicate Kim was in good spirits, smiling occasionally, and engaging Roh in conversation. See for yourself:

Tuesday:

 

The summit between North Korea and South Korea took a strange turn today when news of an offer by the North’s Dear Leader Kim Jong Il to extend the conference by two days emerged. The offer—quickly rejected by South Korean President Roh Moo Hyun—came a day after Kim greeted Roh coldly, seemed disinterested in the talks, and appeared ill. But on Wednesday, reports indicate Kim was in good spirits, smiling occasionally, and engaging Roh in conversation. See for yourself:

Tuesday:

 

Wednesday:

 

On Thursday, the two are expected to issue a joint declaration and unveil a so-called “mystery package,” rumored to include plans for increased economic cooperation and a peace plan that could be the first step towards officially ending the Korean War. 

Was Kim’s improved mood behind the breakthrough and the invitation to stay a few extra days? Was he happy he had finally reached an agreement to dismantle his nuclear weapons? Did he realize he’s in a tight spot with this Syria situation, and hoped a little hospitality might help his international image? Or did Kim ask Roh to stay because he’s “a rittle ronery” all by himself Pyongyang?

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